Comments on: Must investors be on Twitter? http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/03/18/must-investors-be-on-twitter/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: ldaalder http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/03/18/must-investors-be-on-twitter/comment-page-1/#comment-46306 Tue, 19 Mar 2013 05:20:50 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=20936#comment-46306 “the investment community which still operates on 1990s information terms”

Tsssssssss. As if investors are from a different planet, or something. Wasn’t Rick Ashley still popular in the 90s? Get real…

I know a LOT of journalists who are not active on twitter and keep hanging on to their old routines. Probably just as many as investors. It is nonsense to make it look like the two groups differ all that much.

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By: TFF http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/03/18/must-investors-be-on-twitter/comment-page-1/#comment-46305 Mon, 18 Mar 2013 21:57:25 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=20936#comment-46305 At least for small investors, you want to trade the companies, not the news.

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By: jmh530 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/03/18/must-investors-be-on-twitter/comment-page-1/#comment-46302 Mon, 18 Mar 2013 18:50:17 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=20936#comment-46302 I don’t understand why the twittersphere is patting itself so much on the back for this Cyprus news. Everyone knew there was a meeting over the weekend and the EU doing something crazy is always a risk. Not everyone can trade in Japanese markets that open early (and I’m sure that the people who can were well aware of what was happening without the need of twitter). For the mere mortals trading at the opening bell on Monday, there was plenty of news available in many other sources by then.

More often than not, I find news reports on what’s happening in the markets underwhelming. Journalists typically are writing about what happened today, e.g. how much did the S&P500 or oil futures move today. They tend to rationalize these moves to a greater extent than typically makes sense. Unless there is a one standard deviation move or more, it is probably sufficient to say the S&P500 moved today by chance and leave it at that. Understanding broader trends is far more important to investing over the time horizon of most investment managers.

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