Comments on: Annals of gender diversity, Pimco edition http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/04/01/annals-of-gender-diversity-pimco-edition/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: QCIC http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/04/01/annals-of-gender-diversity-pimco-edition/comment-page-1/#comment-46506 Tue, 02 Apr 2013 21:04:49 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=21108#comment-46506 Mangled reply above. That should read:

“PIMCO has zero gender discrimination. Rather it discriminates against individuals (male or female) that aren’t willing to sacrifice their personal / family time for work. ”

Exactly. I work in the non-profit sector and the one thing you can count on in this sector is that the men work 10% more hours than the women prior to pregnancy, and if you factor in pregnancy and the aftermath, vastly more hours than women.

The average woman at my current firm works around 41.5 hours a month and constantly complains about pay equity and discrimination (seriously they do). Meanwhile the average man puts in more like 46 hours and keeps quiet and gets a raise at the end of the year because when there is a deliverable due on a Monday and it is 16:00 on a Friday they either stay until 22:00, or they work over the weekend.

Meanwhile most of the women are out of here by 16:00 every day even if they showed up at 9:00. Granted a lot of this likely has to do with inequitable distribution of at home production in their families, but that is not our employer’s problem.

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By: QCIC http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/04/01/annals-of-gender-diversity-pimco-edition/comment-page-1/#comment-46505 Tue, 02 Apr 2013 21:00:09 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=21108#comment-46505 “PIMCO has zero gender discrimination. Rather it discriminates against individuals (male or female) that aren’t willing to sacrifice their personal / family time for work. ”

Exactly. I work in the non-profit sector and the one thing you can count on in this sector is that the men work 10% more hours than the women prior to pregnancy, and if you factor in pregnancy and the aftermath vastly more hours than women.

The average woman at my current firm works around 41.5 hours a month and constantly complains about tpay eqheir pay (I am serious most of them do)

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By: joe111 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/04/01/annals-of-gender-diversity-pimco-edition/comment-page-1/#comment-46504 Tue, 02 Apr 2013 19:37:23 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=21108#comment-46504 Felix, how about looking in the mirror? A quick google of “Thompson Reuters Executive Team” shows a fancy page with 10 white men, one Indian man, and one black woman (double points here I guess). So you have less than 10% women, and less than 20% non-white management.

Even when I go to the bloggers in the Opinion dropdown on the top of this page only 3 out of 20 are female, or 15%. This is a decidedly non-executive group, and I would love to hear the excuse for why it is hard to find women who blog.

People who live in glass websites should not throw stones…

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By: DavidMerkel http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/04/01/annals-of-gender-diversity-pimco-edition/comment-page-1/#comment-46501 Tue, 02 Apr 2013 17:50:08 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=21108#comment-46501 Jake103’s point is a good one — I’ve seen that in many insurance and investment firms.

I would also note that fixed income tends to be more of a “male game,” from what I have seen, and equities admits more women.

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By: Jake103 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/04/01/annals-of-gender-diversity-pimco-edition/comment-page-1/#comment-46498 Tue, 02 Apr 2013 13:54:08 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=21108#comment-46498 PIMCO has zero gender discrimination. Rather it discriminates against individuals (male or female) that aren’t willing to sacrifice their personal / family time for work. As a result, the leaders tend to be married to stay at home wives who run the households (there are senior woman where the opposite situation exists) or are unmarried / divorced.

The end result is that there are far more men in these senior positions as there tends to be more flexibility or a willingness to choose work over family.

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By: realist50 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/04/01/annals-of-gender-diversity-pimco-edition/comment-page-1/#comment-46494 Tue, 02 Apr 2013 01:20:32 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=21108#comment-46494 “Pimco doesn’t answer to any public shareholders, and cares less about optics than most public companies do”

I realize that Allianz allows PIMCO a large degree of autonomy, but PIMCO is a subsidiary of a publicly-traded company.

The amount of time spent on CNBC by El-Erian and Gross (and Kashkari, when he was still there) also suggests to me that PIMCO cares quite a lot about its public image. My educated guess is that has a lot to do with the amount of money that it manages for public pension funds and university endowments, who are also the sort of investors who might care a lot about the statistics cited in this post.

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By: CasualSophist http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/04/01/annals-of-gender-diversity-pimco-edition/comment-page-1/#comment-46489 Mon, 01 Apr 2013 23:10:44 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=21108#comment-46489 Don’t know the granularity on your data, but may also be instructive to look at the breakout between “client side” and “investment side” — I’d hazard to guess that the majority of the women with VP titles are client facing and not actively involved in investment selection / strategy.

Note: I’m not saying that there’s anything wrong with that; it’s just a disconnect that is pretty typical for the industry.

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