The zombie apocalypse has arrived

By Felix Salmon
October 1, 2013

Have you been involuntarily furloughed today? Are you looking for a good way to spend some of your newly freed-up time? And do you want to understand what’s really going on in Washington? In that case, I can highly recommend that you read John Powers’s brilliant article, The Political Economy of Zombies, over at The Airship.

In Powers’s view, the zombie apocalypse is less horrific than it is utopian: it’s a way to cleanse the world of its otherwise ineradicable neoliberal capitalism, and to pave the way for a much more equal post-capitalist (and post-Zombie) society. “The zombie apocalypse,” he writes, “is as close as we have come in the past 30-odd years to producing a convincing utopian vision for the future that grows out of our present circumstances.”

It was easy to see a lot of people dressed up as zombies during the Occupy protests, and Powers explains what was going on: “Zombies were not being equated with corporate capitalism – they had become the revolution itself. Zombies had become the alternative to the system with no alternative.” Powers quotes anarchist economist David Graeber as saying that neoliberalism has “succeeded magnificently in convincing the world that capitalism – and not just capitalism, but exactly the financialized, semi-feudal capitalism we happen to have right now – is the only viable economic system.”

And he also quotes (of course) Slavoj Zizek:

Look at the movies that we see all the time. It’s easy to imagine the end of the world – an asteroid destroying all of life and so on – but we cannot imagine the end of capitalism.

And then he explains why zombies have become such a common theme in popular culture:

For movie audiences, the mainstream, the 99%, catastrophes aren’t something to dread; they are something to look forward to. They are a catharsis, a conceptual clearing of the deck. They are the implosion of the banking towers at the end of Fight Club, they are the destruction of the White House in Independence Day, they are the wholesale destruction of the entire global map in 2012.

Powers dates the era of utopian zombiedom to the release of 28 Days Later in 2002, a film which opens after the zombie apocalypse, with a scene of Cillian Murphy exploring the now-empty streets of what was formerly the capital of capitalism:

I remember seeing Boyle’s film when it came out in theaters. I went to see it, not because it was a zombie movie, but despite that. Everyone I knew was buzzing about the opening scene in London. It was that image that got me and a lot of other “not into zombies” guys and gals to go see 28 Days Later. It was that same image that got people excited to see I am Legend: It was Manhattan emptied. It was the end of buying and selling. For the majority of us who live within the capitalist system but aren’t of the neoliberal breed of capitalist, catastrophe means no more mortgage payments, no cell phone surveillance, never again having to bicker over what is or isn’t a preexisting condition. Catastrophe voids all obligation, makes the world anew.

Go read Powers’s essay for the, er, fleshed-out version of this argument: it’s well worth it. Or, just watch what Powers calls “the finest moment of all ecstatic wealth destruction in the zombie movie canon”, from Zombieland. My point is that Ted Cruz, and the Tea Party generally, are basically doing their best to play out this exact fantasy. By shutting down the government, they are destroying not a desert gift shop, but rather billions of dollars of real-world economic activity.

In doing so, the Tea Party is proving that it, truly, is the party of the 99% — of the masses who thrill to zombie movies, who fantasize about living in a post-zombie utopia, who understand that you can’t make an omelette without breaking some eggs. We live in a country where the best way to ensure blockbuster status for your summer movie is to blow up as much stuff as possible — a building, a city, the entire world. Highbrow film critics might find such wanton destruction horrific, but the typical moviegoer just finds it thrilling. And when you look at the grass roots of today’s Republican party, it’s easy to see a bunch of heavily-armed zombie hunters: today’s downtrodden masses, perfectly positioned to become tomorrow’s post-apocalyptic elite.

The Tea Party’s “tear it all down” mentality — the worldview which has shut down the government today and which could conceivably even end in debt default, if the debt ceiling isn’t raised — is not, then, the result of any particular political philosophy. I doubt that Ted Cruz spends overmuch time reading Graeber or Zizek. But it’s real, all the same. And if you think that a government shutdown somehow decreases the probability of a debt-ceiling catastrophe, it might be worth thinking again. I fear that instead it might just whet the Republicans’ appetite for more.

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