Comments on: America’s rental crisis http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: AndrewDavid http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48896 Thu, 26 Dec 2013 18:40:11 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48896 This is a pretty awesome article. One of those articles that you find after weeks of searching. And I am grateful that all of that searching was worth it. Because this article is pretty damn awesome. luis souto

]]>
By: Eastvillagechic http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48803 Wed, 11 Dec 2013 16:49:29 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48803 I agree with baroque-quest and Auros. Less inequality would lead to more people being able to buy more stuff, but real estate can be uniquely constrained due to zoning, historic preservation and other land-use restrictions. The current squeeze on renters is not just due to rising income inequality.

]]>
By: Moopheus http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48796 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 21:01:32 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48796 Baroque, haven’t you heard? Apparently we’ll be able to pipe water from aquifers under the sea bed. And I expect that at the rate we’re going, we’ll have drained the Ogallala dry before it gets too contaminated. Yeah, we’re probably f’d no matter what we do.

]]>
By: baroque-quest http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48793 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 18:34:58 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48793 @Moopheus “Do we end up with a country where everyone lives within 100 miles of the coasts and nowhere in the middle? Because that’s where we’re headed”

After fracking contaminates our aquifers, e.g. the Ogallala, we won’t have any choice but to live near the coasts, the Great Lakes, or major rivers, because those will be the only sources for drinkable water (the coasts will require desalinization, of course). Not to mention the food shortages.

]]>
By: rikfre http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48791 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 18:07:19 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48791 I wish someone would pay me to blather the obvious on the internet.

]]>
By: Moopheus http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48792 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 18:07:19 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48792 There is certainly a problem now with high rents in many cities, and some of it is somewhat cyclical. It’s always been the case that our big cities had expensive neighborhoods that only the well-off could afford. But there also places where you could live on less money, working-class and immigrant neighborhoods. It was also the case that the majority of the population lived in more rural areas, away from the cities. Now a much higher percentage live in or near cities. Suburban sprawl is being somewhat reversed; being closer to the urban core is more desirable now as transportation costs rise, and that’s where the jobs are. The old working-class hoods are gentrified and the working-class are pushed out to the edges. Development costs in the cities is so high that only housing for the wealthy is built. More housing is needed, but it is only part of the solution. Better transit options so people can get from the edges in to the city without cars. Also, there are cities where there is cheap, plentiful housing, usually due to low demand, people leaving those areas for lack of work, and not just Detroit. Do we write those cities off or try to make them desirable places to live again? Do we end up with a country where everyone lives within 100 miles of the coasts and nowhere in the middle? Because that’s where we’re headed, and that really is not going to be good in the long run.

http://stateofthecoast.noaa.gov/features  /coastal-population-report.pdf

]]>
By: MyLord http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48790 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 17:06:45 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48790 The problem with trying to better the poor against the rich is it always ends up privileging the old against the new. If it is expensive to rent, I suggest buying, and if you can’t afford the latter, you probably can’t afford the former.

]]>
By: Justafarmer http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48789 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 16:22:16 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48789 Well at least we know the left is on the problem and has a solution. Allowing an additional 50 to 60 million unskilled, lower educational level immigrants into the country should do the trick! “Comprehensive” solution in so many ways.

]]>
By: baroque-quest http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48788 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 15:12:17 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48788 High rents are not a cause, they are an effect. They are not the disease, they are a symptom.

We did not have this problem before three things happened:
1) outsourcing allowed millions of middle class jobs to leave the country; giving companies that do this low tax rates only increases their motivation,
2) we gave assets to the wealthy instead of spreading them out over the population (think bailouts and lower taxes than the ’50s, 60s, and 70s), and
3) H-1B and other visa fictions allowed corporations to replace Americans with much cheaper foreign workers.

Bring back the jobs we lost and Americans will have enough money to pay rent or even buy homes.

]]>
By: Urban_Guerilla http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/12/09/americas-rental-crisis/comment-page-1/#comment-48787 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 11:02:54 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=22859#comment-48787 If rents are higher than people can afford, then either there is insufficient supply or prices are held artificially high.

Truth is we have tried, in many ways, to duck the consequences of the crisis. Using quantitative easing, extend and pretend and all sorts of other measures.

These things have benefited the rich and insulated the higher end of the middle class, but vast swathes of people are left behind.

The more people you leave behind, the higher the odds of a revolution.

Currently, the Anglo Saxon elite is just not being as clever as traditionally they were.

]]>