Felix Salmon

Tim Cook’s improbable victory in Washington

When Apple CEO Tim Cook appeared in front of Carl Levin today, I was hoping for an epic showdown, as presaged by Levin’s highly-aggressive press release yesterday. I was sorely disappointed — although I did end up with a newfound admiration for Tim Cook’s ability to acquit himself with dignity and intelligence and integrity in the toughest of situations.

Why public companies should have public tax returns

Every investigative journalist occasionally dreams of what she might be able to do with monster resources and subpoena power. The answer looks something like Carl Levin, whose latest report on Apple’s tax strategies is Pulitzer-worthy stuff. When Apple CEO Tim Cook testifies in front of Levin today, it’s going to be one of the most uncomfortable grillings of his life. Steve Jobs could be intense — but Carl Levin, in full flow, is truly formidable.

Why Apple should ignore its shareholders

Allan Sloan neatly divides the world of Apple obsessives into two types of people:

How much do Apple employees earn?

Adam Lashinsky, in an excerpt from his new book, says that Apple employees aren’t paid particularly well:

Counterparties

Microsoft releases its Ten Immutable Laws of Computer Security, showcasing their usual flair for graphic design. We particularly like number nine.

Why I’m talking about Tim Cook’s sexuality

Every so often I put a blog post up, start getting feedback on it, and realize I’ve got things horribly wrong. And then sometimes, very rarely, the opposite happens: I put up a post and discover that I was more right than I ever suspected. My post yesterday on Tim Cook’s sexuality is one of those times.

Thanks, Steve

It’s a sad day: only this morning I was reminiscing about my days exploring the Apple Macintosh in Palo Alto in 1984. Like much of the world right now, I’m reliving Steve Jobs’s greatest hits on YouTube, I’ve got a bit of a tear in my eye, and yet I can’t imagine how Jobs could possibly go out on a higher note than this.