Felix Salmon

Why the quants won’t take over Hollywood

Andrew Leonard has a very odd column about Netflix and House of Cards, under the headline “How Netflix is turning viewers into puppets”. Netflix, you see, has lots of data, and it used that data in the commissioning process for the series:

The private-gig kings

It doesn’t surprise me in the slightest that the Monday-night entertainment at the Milken Global Conference this year was Lionel Richie. At 62 years old, Richie is pretty much the median age of conference attendees, and is a perfect calibration of the familiar and the inoffensive, combined with a frisson of star power.

James Murphy’s role in the LCD Soundsystem ticket fiasco

James Murphy, of LCD Soundsystem, is not on Twitter a lot. In the past month, he’s tweeted precisely eight times. But when he was trying to sell tickets to his final show at Madison Square Garden back in February, he was very active. He started on Tuesday February 8, with two tweets to announcements of a ticket presale on February 9. And then after the presale released tickets onto the market, he started getting angry, with a series of eleven tweets expressing violent and profane anger towards scalpers in general and StubHub in particular. It seems his ire was raised by someone selling a single ticket for $1,500.

The dynamic economics of LCD Soundsystem tickets

A clear narrative emerged pretty quickly in the wake of last week’s LCD Soundsystem ticket fiasco. Annie Lowrey tried and failed to get tickets when they went on sale at 11am on Friday, but was foiled:

Deceased icon datapoint of the day

From the WSJ:

After the deaths of other major stars, including Elvis Presley, in 1977, and Kurt Cobain in 1994, around half of outstanding concert tickets were never returned for refund, according to people in the concert business, because fans preferred to keep them as souvenirs.