Felix Salmon

Why movie studios happily violate journalists’ copyright

The white-goods queen of Eighth Avenue asks my opinion on @aoscott adgate. I take requests, over here, so: is it kosher for a movie producer to selectively quote from the Twitter feed of the NYT’s movie reviewer, in a print ad, even when the reviewer in question explicitly said he would not give permission?

How the world benefits from Chinese piracy

Kal Raustiala and Christopher Sprigman have a  fantastic article in the latest issue of Foreign Affairs about IP laws and piracy in China. The title, which I love, is “Fake It Till You Make It,” and the gist is clear:

Prosecute the patent trolls!

Here’s an idea: take the resources that the SEC is currently using to prosecute insider trading, and give them instead to the FTC, so that they can be used to aggressively prosecute patent trolls instead. The cost would be the same (by definition), and the benefit would surely be much greater, as today’s wonderful report from the White House underscores.

Why patent trolls don’t need valid patents

Farhad Manjoo has an interesting profile of Cheryl Malone’s Article One Partners, a company which crowdsources the discovery of prior art for use in patent suits. These “amateur sleuths are stamping out patent trolls,” according to the title of the page; the headline is “How To Kill Patent Trolls.”

Do any real people support SOPA?

Very few of us live in a world remotely representative of the nation as a whole; I certainly don’t. How many of my friends and acquaintances have a college degree? How many live in dense urban centers? How many have smartphones? How many have ever voted Republican? In all these respects and many more, the world I see is incredibly skewed. But what about the Stop Online Piracy Act?

The NYT’s silly trademark spat

Here’s what I don’t get about the NYT’s silly nastygram targeting HuffPo’s new Parentlode blog. It ends like this:

When composers can’t hear their own compositions

Nico Muhly has a fantastic rant about the way in which professional orchestras make it effectively impossible for composers to actually listen to their own pieces, after they’ve been played; the most pungent comment on his post comes from fellow composer Jeff Harrington, who says that he’s never heard a piece that he wrote for two great musicians who have played it 30 times.

The cost of patent trolls

I love This American Life’s investigation into patent troll Nathan Myhrvold and his company Intellectual Ventures. You should go read — or listen to — the whole thing, but in a nutshell, they explored what happened if they took Intellectual Ventures at its word.

Bringing sense to business-method patents

It’s rare that I consider Andrew Ross Sorkin too harsh on Wall Street, but today is one of those times.