Felix Salmon

Wonkonomics

By Felix Salmon
April 9, 2014

My article on the wonk bubble, at Politico, came out not only at the same time as the launch of Vox.com, but also, coincidentally, with the release of comments from both Michael Wolff and Marty Baron on the same subject.

Michael Lewis’s high-speed journalism

By Felix Salmon
April 7, 2014

My full review of Flash Boys is now up at Slate. Tl;dr: he’s right for the wrong reasons. HFT is a bad thing, but not because it rips off small investors.

Against beautiful journalism

By Felix Salmon
March 27, 2014

Have you seen that site’s gorgeous new redesign? Every article has a nice big headline, huge photos, loads of white space, intuitive and immersive scrolling, super-wide column widths — everything you need to make the copy truly sing.

Trish Regan, Einhorn apologist

By Felix Salmon
March 24, 2014

Ever since the story first broke, more than five weeks ago, that David Einhorn was suing Seeking Alpha, the Israeli financial website has been very, very quiet on the topic. Sometimes they have simply failed to respond at all to requests for comment (including mine); other times, as with Andrew Ross Sorkin, a spokesman will formally decline to comment.

Satoshi: Why Newsweek isn’t convincing

By Felix Salmon
March 10, 2014

The Satoshi Paradox

By Felix Salmon
March 7, 2014

Newsweek wanted a scoop for its relaunch cover story, and boy did it deliver: it uncovered the identity of Satoshi Nakamoto, the inventor of bitcoin. Who then promptly came out and denied everything. Which means that one of the two is wrong: either Nakamoto is lying through his teeth, or Newsweek has made what is probably the biggest and most embarrassing blunder in its 81-year history.

Monopolizing bandwidth

By Felix Salmon
February 17, 2014

Paul Krugman makes a simple but powerful point about Comcast’s acquisition of Time Warner Cable:

How should John Arnold approach pension reform?

By Felix Salmon
February 16, 2014

The other shoe has dropped in the case of the $3.5 million which the Laura and John Arnold Foundation donated to a PBS series on “pensions in peril”. The recipient of the money, New York PBS affiliate WNET, has given it back. Understanding what’s really going on here, however, isn’t easy, so bear with me on this one.

Content economics, part 5: news

By Felix Salmon
February 11, 2014

Have you heard the news? Janet’s pregnant!

There’s a reason that the first thing you see when you log in to Facebook — the product around which everything else on Facebook revolves — is called the News Feed. And yet, only a relatively small proportion of what you see in your News Feed can really be considered journalism.