Felix Salmon

Viral math

This chart, from Newswhip via Derek Thompson, has been doing the rounds, and causing a bit of debate:

Digital media goes highbrow

‘Tis the season, it seems, for high-minded new media launches. Last week Arianna Huffington unveiled her new website, The World Post, in front of a group of well-fed plutocrats in Davos; this week it’s the turn of Ezra Klein to announce that he’s going to build a new news site under the Vox Media umbrella, and for Pierre Omidyar to release a video outlining his own journalistic ambitions.

NYT vs Pirrong and Irwin: David Kocieniewski responds

At the end of December, I wrote about the non-scandal of Scott Irwin and Craig Pirrong, a response to a hit-piece in the NYT by David Kocieniewski. Later that week, Kocieniewski offered to answer questions about his article, so I provided some. Here are my questions, along with Kocieniewski’s answer:

Can you fact-check a twerking video?

 

Josh Benton of the Nieman Journalism Lab writes in, asking for a 2014 prediction for the world of news. My answer: 2014 is going to be the year of a big debate about what news is —and especially about whether and how news organizations can ethically report on activity in the virtual world.

The truth about Blackstone and Codere

I’ve always felt that the Daily Show should do more financial stuff, and there’s no doubt that Wednesday’s piece on Blackstone was funny. But it was also extremely credulous about a single Bloomberg article from October.

The evolution of Bloomberg News

Yesterday was a big day for layoffs over at Bloomberg, and Kara Bloomgarden-Smoke has the official memo from editor-in-chief Matt Winkler. In typical Bloomberg style, the defenestrations seem to be taking place in much the same way as they would on Wall Street, with reporters being escorted from the building, never to return. (Bloomberg has a formal policy that once you’ve left, even if your departure was not of your own choosing, you can’t come back.)

The financial-media rollup strategy

Financial news is a classic ripe-for-disruption industry. It generally makes its money by selling expensive subscriptions to the price-insensitive, but that model won’t last forever: it’s never been harder to find anybody under the age of 40 who pays for such things. The trick, for anybody looking to navigate the industry, is to create products which will have a much greater chance of gaining broad traction in a mobile-native world — and which can generate profits through as many revenue streams as possible.

How the NYT neglects business journalism

Brian Abelson has a fantastic post about the performance of NYT articles. The main gist is that it’s possible to predict with surprising accuracy how many pageviews any given NYT article is going to receive, given just a few variables like the amount of time that article spent on the home page, and whether or not it was tweeted by the main @nytimes Twitter account.

Content economics, part 4: scale

The big blog news of the day is that Vox Media has acquired Curbed Network. Why is the news so big? Because, until now, if a major blog property was sold, it was always sold to some media giant — more often than not, AOL — which wanted to add another bloggy arrow or three to its massive content quiver.