Financial Regulatory Forum

Brave new world for U.S. financial stability council after MetLife

May 3, 2016

(Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence) – The U.S. Financial Stability Oversight Council’s recent review of the asset management industry seemed a rather routine piece of regulatory work. But the review released last week comes in a charged atmosphere for the council because of a court decision that rescinded its designation of insurer MetLife as a systemically important financial institution, or SIFI. (more…)

Panama Papers and ‘who owns what’ — big implications for financial services

April 21, 2016

By Julie DiMauro, Regulatory Intelligence

(Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence) – The mushrooming “Panama Papers” scandal is a warning to financial services firms that they cannot be complacent about their obligation to determine beneficial ownership, know their customers, and perform due diligence on all of their business associates. (more…)

‘Panama Papers’ spur calls for U.S. adviser rule on money-laundering controls

April 20, 2016

In the wake of revelations outlining how a Panamanian law firm helped the wealthy stash wealth offshore, 11 financial transparency advocacy groups on Monday urged the U.S. Treasury Department’s anti-money laundering unit to issue a final rule requiring investment advisers to help combat financial crime. An adviser trade group disputed the accuracy of the group’s criticisms, and the Treasury unit developing the rule says it is still weighing public comments. (more…)

COLUMN: Roots of the next financial crisis: the last one’s veterans give views

April 19, 2016

By Lawrence Hsieh, Practical Law for Regulatory Intelligence

(Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence) – There is a general consensus that the next financial crisis will follow the familiar arc of bubble, falling asset values, a run, credit/liquidity crunch, finger-pointing, new regulation, financial innovation, and unintended consequences for both regulation and innovation. There is less consensus about the where, when, how, and why.

U.S. court throws out designation of MetLife as ‘too big to fail’

April 6, 2016

A U.S. federal judge rescinded a government designation of MetLife as “too big to fail” and subject to increased regulatory oversight.

Link cyber and anti-money laundering units, but do not combine them — experts

March 30, 2016

(Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence) – Last month’s cyber attack against Bangladesh’s central bank in which hackers stole $81 million from the bank’s account at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and then laundered the funds has ignited a debate at U.S. financial institutions regarding whether cyber security and anti-money laundering units should be merged to better combat financial crime. (more…)

Potential Supreme Court tie on Obamacare contraceptives could snarl health insurers

March 14, 2016

By Michael Blissenbach, Regulatory Intelligence

(Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence) – The U.S. Supreme Court on March 23 will hear arguments in a major Obamacare case over insurance and contraception, with a range of potential outcomes that became more complicated with the death of Justice Antonin Scalia.

Q&A: Occupy the SEC’s top lawyer, on post-Volcker banking and reform agenda

March 8, 2016

By Lawrence Hsieh, Practical Law for Regulatory Intelligence

(Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence) – New Jersey attorney Akshat Tewary, a founder of the financial reform group Occupy the SEC (OSEC), says fighting on the side of the “99 percent” is an uphill battle, but he can cite successes and a continuing effort to influence industry regulation.

IMPACT ANALYSIS: Data protection practices and governance – action items for firms

March 3, 2016

By Julie DiMauro, Regulatory Intelligence

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence) – Regulators want to see how well the organizations they oversee protect personal data. The challenge is to craft these protection protocols to meet their demands and to provide evidence of compliance.

Ontario’s no-contest settlement with CI Investments a lesson in self-policing

February 25, 2016

The Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) has approved a C$164 million no-contest settlement agreement (PDF) with CI Investments Inc. to compensate investors for the firm’s failure to accurately calculate the value of certain mutual funds. It is the largest investor compensation package to result from a no-contest settlement since the OSC began using them in March 2014, and reflects the intended “self-policing” outcome of the OSC’s Revised Credit for Cooperation Program. (more…)