Financial Regulatory Forum

Corporate governance: boardrooms fret over corporate espionage and federal guidance regimes

By Guest Contributor
March 12, 2012

By Alex Lee

(Business Law Currents) – Dodd-Frank related governance issues such as say-on-pay and proxy access have been well known focal points for boardrooms during the 2012 proxy and annual meeting season, but another issue has topped headlines and is of increasing concern to boardrooms: business intelligence gathering activities. Faced with shareholder oversight, the risks posed by private intelligence gathering firms and governmental regulation in this area, companies must ensure that they abide by accepted best practices, the highest ethical standards and standards for compliance with laws.

Grading Canada’s enforcement efforts

By Guest Contributor
March 8, 2012

By John Mackie

CANADA, March 8 (Business Law Currents) – With the Supreme Court of Canada having put an end to the notion of a national securities regulator this past December, securities regulation and enforcement remain matters of provincial and territorial jurisdiction, at least for the time being. In the wake of that decision, several reports have recently been issued regarding enforcement activities by provincial regulators. (more…)

U.S. financial institutions seen lacking anti-corruption policies for domestic politicians

By Guest Contributor
March 7, 2012

By Brett Wolf

ST. LOUIS/NEW YORK, March 7 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – Despite an international push for financial institutions to crack down on corruption and money laundering linked to political figures, it remains unclear how firms in the United States and abroad will respond.

U.S. Justice Department unit to ramp up hiring as mortgage probes advance

By Guest Contributor
March 6, 2012

By Emmanuel Olaoye

NEW YORK, March 6 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The U.S. Justice Department plans to step up its hiring of staff to investigate abuses in the packaging of residential mortgage backed securities and to work with regulators to uncover serious fraud, a senior department official told Thomson Reuters in the wake of criticisms that Obama administration efforts were insufficient.

Companies should use metrics to defend themselves from Dodd-Frank whistleblower claims, report says

By Guest Contributor
March 5, 2012

By Emmanuel Olaoye

NEW YORK, March 5 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Companies in the United States should focus on implementing performance metrics to defend themselves from whistleblower claims and to prevent misconduct within the company, according to a report from consultancy PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Short-selling and CDS regulation in EU: Less to nakedness than meets the eye, funds and firms argue

By Guest Contributor
March 5, 2012

By Peter Elstob

LONDON/NEW YORK, March 5 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Regulators and market participants continue to differ fundamentally over when a credit default swap should be deemed to be uncovered, or ‘naked’, and when investors are using CDS as a legitimate hedge. If a sovereign CDS can be demonstrated to be hedging counterparty or systemic risk, it can be exempted from the provisions of the proposed European short-selling regulation, which is aimed at abusive use of sovereign CDS by financial institutions to bet against countries’ debt.

U.S. anti-corruption setbacks seen having little impact on company strategies

By Guest Contributor
February 23, 2012

By Brett Wolf

NEW YORK, Feb. 23 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The U.S. Justice Department has suffered a string of setbacks in its efforts to enforce the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, including two this week, but it retains sufficient leverage to persuade companies to settle bribery allegations without a legal fight, sources said.

The Einhorn effect? How the FSA’s authority might be undermined by vocal unrepentant sinners

By Guest Contributor
February 23, 2012

By Peter Elstob

LONDON/NEW YORK, Feb. 23 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – Britain’s Financial Services Authority (FSA) could see its credibility undermined as individuals with deep pockets choose not to challenge fines, instead paying up but then publicly criticising the regulator, a leading regulatory lawyer has warned. “I think it will be interesting to see whether … individuals and firms decide, for good commercial reasons, not to challenge cases, but to either settle them or to leave them uncontested, but then to comment rather adversely on the FSA’s process and finding,” said Helen Marshall, a former senior FSA enforcement official and now a partner at Bingham McCutchen LLP.  (more…)

SOPA, FATCA and the Volcker Rule: the border busters

By Guest Contributor
February 17, 2012
By John Mackie (Canada)

(Business Law Currents) – The global nature of business has perhaps never been more evident than in the wake of the U.S. housing crisis, the natural disasters in Japan and the ongoing European sovereign debt ruckus. Industries and national economies do not exist in a vacuum, nor do the regulatory changes which nations seek to implement in order to address widespread concerns.

Corporate governance: SEC, shareholder activism driving enhanced director disclosure

By Guest Contributor
February 17, 2012

By Alex Lee

NEW YORK, Feb. 17 (Business Law Currents) – With a slew of Dodd-Frank and SEC driven regulations headlining the 2012 proxy season, enhanced director disclosure will be a prominent issue as investors demand heightened corporate accountability and broader levels of transparency. Rules put in place a couple years ago on compensation policies, risk incentivizing, director/nominee disclosure, board structure and oversight have now had the time to incubate sufficiently for companies to respond in a serious manner.