Financial Regulatory Forum

Shorting bans: What the four European regulators are prohibiting (and what they’re not)

By Guest Contributor
August 15, 2011

By Peter Elstob

LONDON, Aug. 15 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – The bans on short-selling the shares in a number of banks and insurance companies (and one stock exchange) that four member states imposed on Friday did not bring the single European rulebook any closer.

Chinese reverse-merger firms delisted in U.S. may go private, lawyers say

By Guest Contributor
August 5, 2011

By Patricia Lee

SINGAPORE, Aug. 5 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Chinese reverse merger companies recently suspended or delisted from U.S. stock exchanges for various breaches may find it more viable to go private than to re-list in the U.S. or elsewhere,  lawyers said. The protracted investigations by U.S. regulators and the potential costs involved in settling the lawsuits mean that, for some companies, selling their entities would be a better strategy.

Recent corporate disclosures reflect unease over U.S. debt ceiling impasse

By Guest Contributor
July 29, 2011

By Thomson Reuters Accelus – Staff

NEW YORK, July 29 (Business Law Currents) The U.S. debt ceiling debate may be a lot of noise to some of  the public, but for companies and investment funds, the governmental standoff has real consequences. The ripple effect through the markets should the government of the United States default on its obligations can’t be fully appreciated. The inevitable credit ratings hit will drive up the already high cost of borrowing for taxpayers. For many companies, who are starting to discuss the debt-ceiling debate in their regulatory filings, it is not only credit markets that will be affected. Independent government contractors may also get stiffed, not to mention lose future business. (more…)

Canada’s Anti-Bribery Cops Reel One In

By Guest Contributor
July 22, 2011

By John Mackie

TORONTO, July 22 (Business Law Currents) – Though Canada has had foreign bribery legislation in effect for over a decade, prosecutions have proven very few and very far between. So it remains to be seen whether the recent guilty plea by Calgary’s Niko Resources under Canada’s Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act marks a scaling-up of Canadian efforts on this front, or just another blip on the radar screen.

Delay in U.S. consumer bureau authority spares non-bank lenders

By Guest Contributor
July 21, 2011

By Ted Knutson

WASHINGTON, July 21 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – A political stalemate over the consumer protection bureau created under the Dodd-Frank financial regulation overhaul is allowing payday loan firms and other non-bank lenders to escape the agency’s authority for now, but industry participants say they have nonetheless boosted lending and disclosure standards.

U.S. ratings downgrade could make it harder for banks to raise capital, experts say

By Guest Contributor
July 20, 2011

By Emmanuel Olaoye

NEW YORK, July 20 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – Any downgrade in the U.S. government’s credit rating stemming from a failure to raise the debt limit would make it harder for American banks to raise capital at a time that they are facing higher capital requirements, banking experts and industry representatives warned. (more…)

Ratings agencies turn tables on global legislators

By Guest Contributor
July 20, 2011

By Christopher Elias

London, July 20 (Business Law Currents) – Governments around the world may regret the vitriol they cast at rating agencies as these American companies turn the tables on sovereign debt-marred governments and drive the agenda in the U.S. and EU.

How the BofA settlement deal got made

By Alison Frankel
June 30, 2011

There are only 30 lawyers at Gibbs & Bruns, the Houston litigation boutique that orchestrated Tuesday’s $8.5 billion settlement between Bank of America and mortgage bond investors. But good things come in small packages. This deal, struck with the noteholders in 530 trusts that issued securities backed by Countrywide mortgage loans, would not have happened without Gibbs partner Kathy Patrick. She put together a coalition of major institutional investors that BofA’s trustee on the securitizations, Bank of New York Mellon, could not afford to ignore. Patrick sent a red-alert warning to the bank last October, by announcing publicly that Gibbs & Bruns and its bondholder clients were gearing up for litigation. That move alone sent BofA’s stock down five percent. Then Patrick worked with lawyers for BofA and BoNY to structure a novel deal that makes sense for all of them.

from Christopher Whalen:

Did the FDIC really kill the repo market?

June 27, 2011

Back in April 2011, Jim Bianco penned a commentary, “Why The Federal Reserve May Have A Hard Time Raising Rates.” He argued that the increase in the FDIC insurance assessment rate for large banks adds to bank funding costs, and thus offsets the impact of Fed ease. Bianco and others infer a roughly 15bp tax or “wedge” on money market assets is created by the FDIC assessment rule.  By way of reference, the Fed’s target band for fed funds is 0 to 25bp but has been at low end of this range for months.

from Tales from the Trail:

The wishful thinking behind a repatriation tax holiday

June 21, 2011

By Ryan McCarthy

The opinions expressed are his own.

Big U.S. multinationals have a strange sense of timing: apparently, now is the ideal time to fight for a tax holiday. The New York Times on Monday had an in-depth look at the topic of a repatriation tax holiday, with lovely charts and a helpful video detailing the myriad ways corporations cut their tax bills by stashing profits overseas. Given the clamoring about lack of demand in the economy, the deficit talks and swollen corporate cash holdings, the lobbying push seems poorly timed at best.