Financial Regulatory Forum

Is the Financial Stability Board the regulator to rule them all?

By Susannah Hammond, Thomson Reuters’ ┬áregulatory intelligence team. The views expressed are her own

LONDON, May 9 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – The Financial Stability Board, regulatory policy maker of choice for the G20, has started to show its teeth. From its roots as the supranational setter of standards, guidance, policies and principles in the wake of the financial crisis, the FSB has started to clarify how it will monitor compliance with its requirements as well as deal forcefully with breaches.

A progress report on one of its strands of work regarding promoting global adherence to regulatory and supervisory standards on international cooperation and information exchange highlights how the FSB uses the International Monetary Fund as its objective reviewer of compliance with international standards. Critically, it shows how the FSB has taken the first steps in setting out the implications for what are called non-cooperative jurisdictions.

The FSB has noted that a small number of jurisdictions prioritised for evaluation have not, as at the end of April 2011, cooperated satisfactorily with the its process for promoting adherence to regulatory and supervisory standards on international cooperation and information exchange. It would appear that in those jurisdictions the authorities have, for whatever reason, chosen not to speak to the FSB.

The FSB says it will continue to pursue dialogue and has tried a variety of channels in an attempt to get the jurisdictions concerned to engage with the process. The FSB goes on to state that: “other measures may be implemented to apply additional pressure”. However, it does not say what those measures might be or how the pressure will be applied. The FSB will publish a list of non-cooperative jurisdictions if positive measures are not seen to be making sufficient progress. The use of such name-and-shame lists is deemed to have been effective at incentivising improvements in other areas such as tax standards.

COLUMN – So, banker, how much do you get paid?

Bank Street, LondonBy Keith Mullin, Editor at Large, International Financing Review; the views expressed are his own

LONDON, Jan 7 (Reuters) – The New Year began as the old one ended, with a flurry of histrionics and hyperbole around the… OK, admittedly salacious… topic of bank bonuses.

The problem is there are now so many official, semi-official and generally interfering bodies and organisations spouting forth sanctimoniously and/or contradictorily about how banks should structure their compensation schemes and how much they should pay their staff that the only inevitable result – mystification – has duly been reached. (more…)

FACTBOX – Comparing EU and U.S. financial reform

LONDON, May 21 (Reuters) – The U.S. Senate approved a reform of Wall Street on Thursday and President Barack Obama may be signing into law the most sweeping changes to financial rules since the 1930s as soon as next month.

It implements pledges the United States, the European Union and other leading countries in the Group of Twenty made in 2009.

With the United States set to adopt its reform soon — and thus easily meet G20 deadlines — the EU has to play catch-up in some cases. Banks are watching carefully as transatlantic differences are emerging that will affect business models.

  •