Financial Regulatory Forum

New Iran sanctions most threaten non-U.S. banks

By Guest Contributor
January 20, 2012

* U.S. Treasury under pressure to draft tough Iran sanctions

* New law targets banks including central banks

* Impact seen strongest on non-U.S. banks

 

By Brett Wolf

ST. LOUIS, Jan 20 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – The U.S. Treasury Department is under bipartisan pressure to draft tough rules implementing an Iranian sanctions law enacted in December. While the effect on U.S. financial institutions is likely to be minimal, foreign financial institutions may take a hit. (more…)

Banking on Volcker: Big Crisis, Big Rule

By Guest Contributor
October 19, 2011

By Thomson Reuters Accelus staff

NEW YORK, Oct. 19 (Business Law Currents) – Banking lawyers should be forgiven if they’re not returning calls right away: they’re busy trying to digest the Volcker Rule (or “the rule”). The proposed rule’s 298-page doorstop represents the collective efforts of the Treasury Department, Fed, FDIC and SEC to implement §619 of the Dodd-Frank Act, which itself added a new §13 to the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (the BHC Act). The intent of the Volcker Rule is to “generally prohibit any banking entity from engaging in proprietary trading or from acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in, sponsoring, or having certain relationships with a hedge fund or private equity fund (“covered fund”), subject to certain exemptions.”

from Global News Journal:

Brussels’ MEPs ready to duke it out with bankers

February 4, 2010

Every new year brings resolutions, and the European Parliament is no exception.

Often derided as a multi-lingual talking shop, the institution is feeling newly invigorated by some fresh faces and by the European Union's Lisbon reform treaty, which came into force late last year and gives the 736-member parliament more say in drafting laws and acting as a check on legislation.

UK government rejects brokerage complaints over “bullying” by rescued banks

By Reuters Staff
November 17, 2009

A video grab image shows Britain's City minister Paul Myners speaking at a Treasury Committee in London March 17, 2009.     REUTERS/Parbul TV Via Reuters TV  (BRITAIN BUSINESS POLITICS) LONDON, Nov 17 (Reuters) – Britain’s government has batted away complaints from three top brokerages about “bullying” and unfair competition by bailed-out lenders, telling them to make a virtue of their independence or seek help from the consumer watchdog.

Britain’s top retail banks set for shake-up

By Reuters Staff
November 3, 2009

  LONDON, Nov 3 (Reuters) – Britain is set to announce on Tuesday a long-awaited deal with its bailed-out banks, including a record rights issue for Lloyds Banking Group and hefty disposals for Royal Bank of Scotland to appease the EU competition regulator and boost competition.

Swiss hunt Italian agents as tax row deepens

By Reuters Staff
October 29, 2009

ROME, Oct 29 (Reuters) – A row between Italy and Switzerland over tax evasion deepened on Thursday with one Swiss region launching a hunt for Italian agents trespassing on its soil as Rome warned against retaliation for its raids on Swiss banks.

Japan bank minister says repayment halt good for banks

By Reuters Staff
September 18, 2009

Japan's newly appointed Financial Services and Postal Services Minister Shizuka Kamei speaks during a news conference at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo September 16, 2009.   REUTERS/Issei Kato By David Dolan and Noriyuki Hirata
TOKYO, Sept 19 (Reuters) – Japan’s new banking minister said his plan to freeze the repayment of bank loans to help debt-burdened individuals and small companies would be a positive for the banks, even as investors have fled financial stocks.

U.S. tax evaders rush to beat amnesty deadline

By Reuters Staff
September 14, 2009

By Kim Dixon
WASHINGTON, Sept 14 (Reuters) – Rich Americans who have evaded taxes by hiding foreign holdings have about a week to turn themselves in to an Internal Revenue Service amnesty program or gamble they will not be caught.
(more…)

Dodd banking panel choice in U.S. seen as negative for banks

By Reuters Staff
September 9, 2009

By Kevin Drawbaugh
WASHINGTON, Sept 9 (Reuters) – A decision by U.S. Senator Christopher Dodd to stay chairman of the Senate Banking Committee would increase chances for consumer-oriented reforms that would restrict banks, according to a research report on Wednesday, with a Dodd announcement expected soon.

Goldman boss says anger over pay justified, warns of rules overkill

By Reuters Staff
September 9, 2009

Combination photograph of Wall Street bank executives testifying before House Financial Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, February 11, 2009.  Top row (L-R), are: Bank of New York's Robert Kelly, JPMorgan Chase's Jamie Dimon, Goldman Sachs' Lloyd Blankfein and Wells Fargo's John Stumpf. Bottom row (L-R), are: CitiGroup's Vikram Pandit, Morgan Stanley's John Mack, Bank of America's Ken Lewis and State Street's Ronald Logue.  By Edward Taylor

FRANKFURT, Sept 9 (Reuters) – The head of U.S. bank Goldman Sachs said on Wednesday that anger over bankers’ pay was “understandable and appropriate”, and that greater scrutiny of trade in complex instruments was needed to keep banks in check.   But with the banking sector bouncing back from the financial crisis, regulatory overkill could choke off economic growth, Lloyd Blankfein told an industry conference in Germany’s financial hub.