Financial Regulatory Forum

from Tales from the Trail:

Think brussels sprouts and cauliflower are agricultural commodities? Think again.

October 19, 2010

While the financial bailouts tossed to automakers, banks and other groups during the recent economic crisis left a funny taste in the mouth of some Americans, one former U.S. regulator hopes efforts to prevent another panic doesn't go rotten.

PREVIEW-Final act begins in U.S. Congress on Wall St reform

By Reuters Staff
June 7, 2010

By Kevin Drawbaugh

WASHINGTON, June 7 (Reuters) – Negotiators from the U.S. Senate and House will begin meeting this week to craft a final Wall Street reform bill, with banks facing changes that threaten their profits, if not their business models.

INTERVIEW-Rep Frank: Fed as consumer watchdog home a “joke”

By Reuters Staff
March 2, 2010

WASHINGTON, March 2 (Reuters) – Representative Barney Frank, chief architect of financial reform in the U.S. Congress, told Reuters on Tuesday he “thought it was a joke” when he learned key senators were discussing putting a new financial consumer watchdog inside the Federal Reserve.

US Rep Frank sees ending Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac in current form

By Reuters Staff
January 22, 2010

WASHINGTON, Jan 22 (Reuters) – Mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are likely to be abolished in their current form, a key lawmaker in the U.S. House of Representatives said on Friday.

U.S. House OKs Fed audit provision, eyes on Senate

By Reuters Staff
December 12, 2009

By Mark Felsenthal

WASHINGTON, Dec 11 (Reuters) – The U.S. Federal Reserve on Friday lost the opening round in a battle to defeat a congressional plan to subject its interest rate decisions to audits, and will now look for a comeback victory when the Senate starts to move on regulatory reforms.

Financial reforms win procedural vote in US House

By Reuters Staff
December 10, 2009

By Kevin Drawbaugh

WASHINGTON, Dec 9 (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives approved a procedural rule on Wednesday that cleared the way for floor debate to begin on legislation that would give the government broad new powers over large financial firms and tighten bank and capital market regulation.

US lawmakers urged to drop clearinghouse ownership cap

By Reuters Staff
November 20, 2009

U.S. Representative Barney Frank (D-MA) holds a news conference on issues before the House Financial Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, November 3, 2009.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst   By Jonathan Spicer
NEW YORK, Nov 20 (Reuters) – NYSE Euronext, LCH.Clearnet, BATS Global Markets and other firms partnered with banks have urged two U.S. legislators to drop a proposed “rigid” cap on dealer ownership of clearinghouses, according to a letter sent this week.

U.S. House Democrats sharpening ‘too big to fail’ plan

By Reuters Staff
November 18, 2009

U.S. Representative Barney Frank (D-MA) holds a news conference on issues before the House Financial Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, November 3, 2009.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst    (UNITED STATES POLITICS BUSINESS) By Kevin Drawbaugh
WASHINGTON, Nov 17 (Reuters) – A key U.S. congressional panel moved toward toughening a plan for dealing with “too big to fail” financial firms on Tuesday, while rejecting a Republican alternative backed by Wall Street.

Banks sense danger, warn U.S. Congress on breakup power

By Reuters Staff
November 17, 2009

By Kevin Drawbaugh
WASHINGTON, Nov 16 (Reuters) – Some of the world’s largest financial firms on Monday urged a top U.S. lawmaker not to pursue big bank break-up legislation, an idea attracting interest in Congress and causing alarm on Wall Street.

US Rep. Frank seeks changes in derivatives bill

By Reuters Staff
November 4, 2009

U.S. Representative Barney Frank (D-MA), Chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, listens to a reporter's question during the Reuters Global Financial Regulation Summit in Washington, April 28, 2009.     WASHINGTON, Nov 4 (Reuters) – The chairman of the U.S. House Financial Services Committee is seeking changes to draft legislation for the $450 trillion privately-traded derivatives markets, with the intent of making it harder for banks to avoid trading the contracts on exchanges.