Financial Regulatory Forum

Federal Reserve issues technical fix to market-risk capital rule to conform with Basel III

By Guest Contributor
December 12, 2013

By Bora Yagiz, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Dec. 12 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The Federal Reserve Board issued a final rule that makes technical changes to the Board’s market-risk capital rule to align it with the Basel III revised capital framework adopted by the Board earlier this year. (more…)

U.S. regulators’ Basel III rules package signals intent to maintain momentum in big-bank reforms

By Guest Contributor
July 17, 2013

By Bora Yagiz

NEW YORK, July 17 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - In a move considered to be the most complete overhaul of U.S. bank capital standards since Basel I in 1988, three U.S. banking regulators (the Federal Reserve Board, Office of Comptroller of the Currency, and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation) have finalized the three Basel III-related notices of proposed rulemaking (NPRs) from 2012 on capital rules.

CORRECTED: Bank regulators globally add AML to safety and soundness issues

By Guest Contributor
July 8, 2013

By Nick Paraskeva, for Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, July 8 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Bank regulators around the globe are increasingly focusing on anti-money laundering (AML) and operational risks as part of their role in overseeing institutional safety and soundness. This follows huge enforcement fines imposed on systemically important banks by regulators and justice ministries. It also reflects a concern that any attendant hit on a bank’s reputation could affect its ability to obtain short-term funding or trade other than on a fully-secured basis.

Basel paper offers new look at bail-in models for ailing institutions

By Guest Contributor
June 12, 2013

By Bora Yagiz, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, June 12 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - A recent Bank for International Settlements (BIS) quarterly review article attempts to solve the too-big-to-fail (TBTF) problem without causing systemic disruption to financial markets, by offering a new resolution template to recapitalize banks on the verge of bankruptcy. It may, however, inadvertently legitimize a de facto bail-in model against the consent of depositors, and put their money at risk.

No bank is ‘too big to jail,’ U.S. Attorney General Holder warns

By Guest Contributor
May 20, 2013

By Stuart Gittleman, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, May 20 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Corruption, cyber threats and transnational organized crime – and the money laundering that greases the wheels of illicit commerce – are high on the list of law enforcement priorities, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder told the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday. (more…)

U.S. consumer bureau’s mortgage servicing rules are in the right direction despite shortcomings

By Guest Contributor
August 31, 2012

By Bora Yagiz

NEW YORK, Aug. 31 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The Consumer Finance Protection Bureau’s proposed rules earlier this month on mortgage servicing are a step in the right direction in its efforts to uproot the malpractices that were once prevalent in the subprime mortgage market. The proposals suffer from a few shortcomings, however, not the least because the Bureau, with its “one-size-fits-all” approach, seems to have ignored the nuances between the different players within the servicing industry. (more…)

Fed’s capital proposal not as tough as feared, may give U.S. banks advantage

By Guest Contributor
December 22, 2011

By Rachel Wolcott

NEW YORK/LONDON, Dec. 22 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Considering the cost of the financial crisis to the American taxpayer — anywhere between $700 billion and $12.8 trillion depending on who you talk to — the proposed capital rules the Federal Reserve published yesterday seem pretty lenient, compare to those mooted by some European countries.

MF Global bankruptcy shows regulatory resolve

By Guest Contributor
November 1, 2011

By Nick Paraskeva

Nov. 1 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The collapse of MF Global Holdings is the first major U.S. financial bankruptcy since new Dodd-Frank insolvency laws ended the doctrine of “too big to fail,” as well as being the first U.S. failure attributable to the Euro crisis. While the collapse is expected to be handled under pre-Dodd Frank bankruptcy laws and under the Securities Investor Protection Corp., it may signal that regulators are prepared to take earlier action when they see uncovered financial risks.

Is the medicine for financial services turning out to be worse than the disease?

By Guest Contributor
September 9, 2011

By Susannah Hammond

LONDON/NEW YORK , Sept. 9 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – Almost three years on from the fall of Lehman Brothers and the widespread public bail-out of financial services the world is looking grim. In the white heat of the crisis itself jurisdictions, policymakers and governments moved together to resolve the worst of the immediate issues and bought global financial services time to heal. While some recovery and mending of balance sheets has certainly taken place, global financial services continue to suffer at the hands of divergent policymakers, international recessions and sovereign debt crises.

Basel III: Chinese banks saving for new capital adequacy ratio

By Guest Contributor
August 26, 2011

By Helen H. Chan

HONG KONG, Aug. 26 (Business Law Currents) – New capital adequacy rules from the China Banking Regulatory Commission (CBRC) are prompting banks to hit up investors in Hong Kong and Shanghai’s capital markets. Part of the Basel III implementation process, the rules will require Chinese lenders to shore up additional capital to protect against credit risks.