Financial Regulatory Forum

Dodd says the threat to financial reform real but not complete – Complinet Interview

U.S. Senator Christopher DoddBy Ted Knutson, Complinet

As Democratic U.S. Senator Christopher Dodd prepares to leave office, Republicans are threatening to chip away at what may be his biggest legislative accomplishment: the Wall Street regulation overhaul he helped steer through Congress this year as chairman of the Senate Banking Committee. It was the biggest fix to the financial regulatory system in 70 years, and Republicans emboldened by November election gains are looking to deny regulators the extra money they want to enforce it, and to delay seating a head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

Dodd said in an interview with ThomsonReuters unit Complinet that the damage to a “real darn good bill” could be real, but not complete. In his half-hour interview last Friday, Dodd looked ahead to the future of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and back at the two-year process that led to its creation.

Complinet: How much would it damage regulatory reform if Republicans block budget increases for the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission that say they need to implement it? (more…)

US Senate OKs plan for dismantling ailing financial giants – details

WASHINGTON, May 5 (Reuters) – The U.S. Senate on Wednesday approved an amendment to a sweeping Wall Street reform bill that would set up a new government protocol for seizing and dismantling large financial firms that are in distress.

Here is a description of the bipartisan plan, in a statement by Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd, a Democrat.

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ANALYSIS – Democrats bet politics favor US financial reforms

By Kevin Drawbaugh

WASHINGTON, Feb 18 (Reuters) – The next round of betting is near in a high-stakes game to tighten U.S. financial regulation and Democrats are wagering heavily on a hunch — that some Republicans cannot afford politically to block reform.

The view is strongly held at the White House, where officials remain confident, despite setbacks, that reforms will be approved by Congress this year, said congressional aides.

President Barack Obama and the Democrats need a boost as they head into November’s midterm congressional elections after disappointing outcomes on healthcare and climate change,

Consumer watchdog debate threatens U.S. financial reform

    By Kevin Drawbaugh

  WASHINGTON, Feb 12 (Reuters) – A  fight over how sharp to make the teeth of a new U.S. watchdog for financial consumers threatened on Friday to derail progress toward tighter bank and capital market regulation, amid much posturing on both sides.

Democrats want an independent agency that can clamp down hard on abusive mortgages and credit cards, but Republicans and bank lobbyists want a tamer beast that won’t threaten profits too much and that answers to a higher master.

The Obama administration’s proposal to create a U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Agency (CFPA) has emerged as the main impediment to bipartisan agreement on financial regulation reform, one of the White House’s major priorities for 2010.

Republican Gregg sees common ground in U.S. Senate on financial regulation

 WASHINGTON, Feb 12 (Reuters) – The top Republican on the U.S. Senate Budget Committee said on Friday there is common ground with Democrats on financial regulation legislation but the White House stance on consumer protection remains an obstacle.

“There’s a lot of common ground here. This really isn’t a partisan issue. This is an extremely complex exercise in getting governance right and the only really big philosophical difference here is how you protect consumers,” Senator Judd Gregg said in an interview with CNBC.

Judd was speaking a day after Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd, a Democrat, said he was discussing legislation with Senator Bob Corker, a first-term Republican member of the panel.

Talks resume in U.S. Senate on financial reform

WASHINGTON, Feb 11 (Reuters) – In an unusual move that cuts a senior Republican out of the loop, bipartisan U.S. Senate negotiations have resumed on financial regulation reform, the chairman of the Senate Banking Committee said on Thursday.

Committee chairman Christopher Dodd, a Democrat, said in a statement that he has begun talks on legislation with Bob Corker, a first-term Republican member of the panel handling a sweeping regulatory overhaul package.

Just six days ago, Dodd said he had hit an impasse with Senator Richard Shelby, the committee’s top Republican, in talks under way for more than a year.

Financial reform talks break down in U.S. Senate

Dodd and Shelby, in happier times

Dodd and Shelby, in happier times

By Kevin Drawbaugh and Kim Dixon

WASHINGTON, Feb 5 (Reuters) – Bipartisan efforts to tighten U.S. financial regulation ground to a halt in the Senate on Friday, leaving Democrats to proceed on their own and painting Republicans into an uncomfortable political corner.

After months of public debate and closed-door talks, Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd, chief negotiator for the Democrats, said he is at an impasse with his Republican counterpart, Senator Richard Shelby.

Dodd said in a statement he will begin drafting new legislation to be considered later this month.

Obama bid to rein in banks meets Senate resistance

By Kevin Drawbaugh

WASHINGTON, Feb 4 (Reuters) – The U.S. Senate on Thursday looked increasingly likely to adopt, at best, only a watered-down version of the Obama administration’s ambitious proposal to limit risky trading by banks.

After two hearings in three days on the issue, Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd told reporters it will be difficult to legislate a curb on bank trading practices as specific as the White House proposed last month.

He said it would be easier to include something less ambitious in a sweeping package of financial regulation reforms, under development for more than a year now, which aides said was fast nearing completion.

Key U.S. senators see deal on regulatory reform

   WASHINGTON, Dec 23 (Reuters) – The top Democrat and Republican on the U.S. Senate Banking Committee said on Wednesday they hoped to resolve their differences on financial regulatory reforms before the Senate reconvenes in January.

“For the last few weeks we, and other members of the Banking Committee, have been engaged in serious negotiations, with the goal of producing a bill that strengthens our regulatory structure and makes our economy more secure,” Senators Christopher Dodd and Richard Shelby said in a joint statement.

“We have made meaningful progress and we hope to resolve the remaining issues before we reconvene in January,” they said.

U.S. House OKs Fed audit provision, eyes on Senate

By Mark Felsenthal

WASHINGTON, Dec 11 (Reuters) – The U.S. Federal Reserve on Friday lost the opening round in a battle to defeat a congressional plan to subject its interest rate decisions to audits, and will now look for a comeback victory when the Senate starts to move on regulatory reforms.

The House of Representatives delivered the loss with a 223-202 vote in favor of a revamp of financial regulation that, among other things, would pare Fed supervision over financial firms and its capacity to provide emergency help to banks, while allowing audits of monetary policy by a watchdog agency.

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and other top officials for weeks had argued the audit provision would result in a costly impression that the central bank’s rate decisions could be swayed by politics. They warned this could lead financial markets to fear inflationary policies, which in turn could drive up borrowing costs and undermine the economy.

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