Financial Regulatory Forum

U.S. regulation risks a “Balkanization” of cross-border capital

By Henry Engler, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Mar. 12 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The term “unintended consequences” has often been used by critics of U.S. regulatory reform when characterizing its complexities. While well-intentioned individually, when unleashed in unison the multiple requirements banks that face become highly unpredictable, including across national borders. (more…)

Compliance Insight: UK regulators gain more power over overseas firms and individuals

By Jane Walshe, Compliance Complete

LONDON/NEW YORK, July 3 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The new regulatory structure that came in to being on April 1, 2013 introduced changes not just to the form of regulation, but also to its substance, including extensive new powers over unauthorised parent undertakings with operations on UK soil.  (more…)

Retraction of global correspondent banking networks challenges financial-crime risk management

By Kim R. Manchester, Contributing author for Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, July 2 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Global correspondent banks have faced numerous challenges since the onset of the financial crisis in 2008, including heavy scrutiny by regulators on money-laundering and terrorism-financing defenses, shrinking transaction volumes, slashed profit margins and risk parameters that defy rational measurement. A Financial Times report on how global correspondent banks are clawing back the reach of their correspondent banking network operations and trimming respondent banks from their client lists comes as no surprise to the casual observer of international banking.

For the financial intelligence community, this retraction by global correspondent banks will blur their insight into international money laundering and terrorism financing networks and hamper efforts to disrupt organised crime and terrorist groups. For financial institutions, the retraction of networks will create new challenges in financial crime risk management, with painful and expensive consequences if compliance programs are not tailored to meet money laundering and terrorist financing threats within correspondent banking. (more…)

Future higher ethical standards will judge today’s conduct, compliance experts say

By Stuart Gittleman, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, March 14 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Companies that want to manage their legal and regulatory liability and their reputational capital should treat current standards as the starting point – not the finish line – for their ethics and compliance programs, conference attendees heard Tuesday.

“Your company will be judged in the future by what it does today. Transparency is rapidly increasing, and you don’t know how it will affect your business and reputation,” one of the speakers, Dirk Mohrmann, chief executive officer of World Compliance, told attendees at the 2013 Global Ethics Summit, which was held in New York and was sponsored by Ethisphere and Thomson Reuters. (more…)

UBS felony plea in Libor deal ushers in tougher enforcement era

By Nick Paraskeva, Compliance Complete contributor

NEW YORK, Dec. 21 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The UBS felony fraud plea for manipulating reporting of the Libor interbank lending rate marks a regulatory turning point towards tougher enforcement. After the U.S. election confirmed Dodd-Frank is here to stay, and with most Group of 20 reforms mapped out, rulemaking will proceed at a slower pace. The shift will impact the financial-industry, both in the U.S. and globally, which will face a greater supervisory willingness to impose high penalties, and a focus on ethical compliance.

“Today’s announcement – and $1.5 billion global resolution – underscores the Justice Department’s firm commitment to investigating and prosecuting such conduct, and to holding perpetrators of these crimes accountable for their actions,” said U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder in announcing the deal this week. His involvement in the enforcement was notable, as previous announcements have been made by Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer. (more…)

U.S. broker-dealers scrutinized for anti-laundering compliance in Venezuelan currency swaps

By Brett Wolf

NEW YORK, Nov. 13 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Securities industry regulators are beginning to ask U.S. broker-dealers tough questions about how they are mitigating money laundering and sanctions risks associated with their involvement in a 2-year-old currency exchange system run by the Venezuelan government, sources familiar with the issue said.

“There are a lot of questions being asked by regulators and compliance officers,” said Sven Stumbauer, managing director of Veris Consulting Inc’s Miami office. “And some broker-dealers, especially small introducing brokers, cannot answer them.” (more…)

Firms subject to U.S. FATCA advised to press on with preparing despite rule delay

By Emmanuel Olaoye

WASHINGTON/NEW YORK, Nov. 6 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Financial institutions should take advantage of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service’s decision to postpone key start dates in the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) and not wait for the U.S. Treasury to issue its final rules before they start their preparations, experts told Compliance Complete.

“If you put off your efforts or suspend them for too long I think you’ll fall way too far behind. I think you’ll have a very difficult time doing what you have to do. At this point you should have a very clear idea of what your current systems and procedures can and can’t do and how they are going to have to be modified,” said John Staples, managing partner of the law firm Burt, Staples & Maner, LLP. (more…)

U.S. Treasury to move by year end on plan to exempt forex swaps, sources say

By Emmanuel Olaoye

WASHINGTON, Oct. 24 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The U.S. Treasury Department will move ahead after the Nov. 6 U.S. national elections to issue its plan for exempting foreign exchange swaps, a banking industry source said. A senior government official said a decision on the issue was expected by year end, after international standards setters complete work on derivatives margin requirements.

The Treasury plan, which was proposed in April 2011, would exempt instruments such as foreign exchange swaps and forward contracts from new rules affecting dealers in the $650 trillion over-the-counter derivatives market.  (more…)

Regulators globally seek to curb supercomputer trading glitches

By Christopher Elias

LONDON, Aug. 31, (Business Law Currents) - A series of stock market glitches has prompted regulators around the world to introduce new regulations to limit the impact of computer malfunctions on trading. Shielding markets from another Knight Capital disaster, the new rules seek to defend market participants from malicious machines and risky robots. (more…)

Staging “Macbeth” in Manhattan: enforcement in the aftermath of Libor and Standard Chartered

By Justin O’Brien, Thomson Reuters Accelus contributing author

LONDON/NEW YORK, Aug. 31 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Despite the lack of commentary from either the White House or federal executive agencies, the Standard Chartered investigation — and the manner in which it was handled — is certain to reignite the festering feud over how to regulate finance. Absent the physical bloodshed, the power struggle for control of banking regulation and how to change its culture finds remarkable parallels in Macbeth, the classic Shakespearean tale of political infighting. As with Banquo’s Ghost, the spectre of Eliot Spitzer and his battles with federal counterparts over the purpose of regulation looms large.  (more…)

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