Financial Regulatory Forum

Staging “Macbeth” in Manhattan: enforcement in the aftermath of Libor and Standard Chartered

By Guest Contributor
August 31, 2012

By Justin O’Brien, Thomson Reuters Accelus contributing author

LONDON/NEW YORK, Aug. 31 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Despite the lack of commentary from either the White House or federal executive agencies, the Standard Chartered investigation — and the manner in which it was handled — is certain to reignite the festering feud over how to regulate finance. Absent the physical bloodshed, the power struggle for control of banking regulation and how to change its culture finds remarkable parallels in Macbeth, the classic Shakespearean tale of political infighting. As with Banquo’s Ghost, the spectre of Eliot Spitzer and his battles with federal counterparts over the purpose of regulation looms large.  (more…)

Short-selling and CDS regulation in EU: Less to nakedness than meets the eye, funds and firms argue

By Guest Contributor
March 5, 2012

By Peter Elstob

LONDON/NEW YORK, March 5 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Regulators and market participants continue to differ fundamentally over when a credit default swap should be deemed to be uncovered, or ‘naked’, and when investors are using CDS as a legitimate hedge. If a sovereign CDS can be demonstrated to be hedging counterparty or systemic risk, it can be exempted from the provisions of the proposed European short-selling regulation, which is aimed at abusive use of sovereign CDS by financial institutions to bet against countries’ debt.

U.S. anti-corruption setbacks seen having little impact on company strategies

By Guest Contributor
February 23, 2012

By Brett Wolf

NEW YORK, Feb. 23 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The U.S. Justice Department has suffered a string of setbacks in its efforts to enforce the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, including two this week, but it retains sufficient leverage to persuade companies to settle bribery allegations without a legal fight, sources said.