Financial Regulatory Forum

Retaliation rate against U.S. company whistleblowers climbs, senior staff affected, survey finds

By Julie DiMauro

NEW YORK, Sept. 6 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Retaliation against workplace whistleblowers is rising sharply, expanding into previously safe categories of employees such as senior-level managers and even in workplaces with notably strong ethical cultures, a study found.

The trend comes as new regulations require more formal reporting channels for internal whistleblowing and more managers use them, study sponsors said. They recommended that companies more closely monitor what happens to whistleblowers after they report. (more…)

Offshore U.S. oversight of derivatives may bolster defenses against JPMorgan-type losses

By Nick Paraskeva

NEW YORK, May 29 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – U.S. regulators are looking to use new their oversight authority over foreign derivatives trades to reduce the chances of new shocks such as JPMorgan Chase & Co’s trading loss of at least $2 billion.

Pointing out that JPMorgan’s money-losing trades on a credit default swap index were conducted in a London unit, similar to recent failures at AIG and Lehman Brothers, Commodity Futures Trading Commission Chairman Gary Gensler said implementation of Dodd-Frank regulatory reform rules would improve supervision of such activity in the future by expanding cross-border oversight. (more…)

Companies should use metrics to defend themselves from Dodd-Frank whistleblower claims, report says

By Emmanuel Olaoye

NEW YORK, March 5 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Companies in the United States should focus on implementing performance metrics to defend themselves from whistleblower claims and to prevent misconduct within the company, according to a report from consultancy PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Using metrics such as the turnover of compliance staff and the percentage of anonymous reports can help a company monitor the performance of its compliance program. It can also help to reduce the chances of an employee reporting misconduct directly to the Securities and Exchange Commission, PwC said in the report, which is an analysis of whistleblower rules included in the Dodd-Frank regulatory overhaul and adopted last May by the SEC. (more…)

Global regulation 2011: a review of policies that shaped the business world

Jan. 10 (Business Law Currents) — Global regulators have been anything but idle in 2011. Predictably, the U.S. regulatory landscape was dominated by the 800-lb. statutory gorilla, the Dodd-Frank Act. Canada busied itself trying to accommodate Basel III’s coming capital requirements. Anti-bribery regulation managed to elbow its way into UK headlines in spite of a phone hacking scandal and a royal wedding. China cracked down on loopholes for variable interest entities, while Australia’s new tax regime found few friends in the mining sector down under. (more…)

U.S. financial services can expect more Dodd-Frank in 2012, not less

By Rachel Wolcott

NEW YORK, Dec.16 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – When congressman Barney Frank announced he would not seek another term, enemies were quick to predict the demise of the wide-ranging financial reform act that the Massachusetts Democrat penned with former Connecticut Senator Chris Dodd. These pronouncements are not just premature, but according to regulatory experts, probably wrong. Unless there is a real seismic political shift to the right after the 2012 elections, they say, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act 2010 will survive, perhaps with a little tinkering, and firms had better be prepared to deal with it.

Dodd-Frank will only face a real threat if the Republicans take the White House and a majority in the U.S. Senate, while hanging on to the House of Representatives. Right now, with former House Speaker Newt Gingrich the latest to surge to the top of the Republican pack of presidential candidates, the likely outcome of November presidential elections is far from clear. If President Barack Obama, who signed Dodd Frank into law, stays in office, he can use his veto power to try to protect Dodd-Frank. (more…)

Delay in U.S. consumer bureau authority spares non-bank lenders

By Ted Knutson

WASHINGTON, July 21 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – A political stalemate over the consumer protection bureau created under the Dodd-Frank financial regulation overhaul is allowing payday loan firms and other non-bank lenders to escape the agency’s authority for now, but industry participants say they have nonetheless boosted lending and disclosure standards.

Institutions including non-bank mortgage companies, student loan providers and payday lenders, and their trade organizations discussed their views with Thomson Reuters before Thursday’s official launch of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

(more…)

The Rajaratnam Verdict: Tip of the Iceberg – ANALYSIS

NEW YORK, May 18 (Business Law Currents) – The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s trophy case gets a new addition with the conviction of Raj Rajaratnam, but shelf room is still available.

For all its publicity, the Rajaratnam case was merely one of many; since late 2009, insider trading probes related to Galleon have resulted in 13 additional guilty pleas. In recent months, some of the country’s most prestigious names have been linked to what appears to be a widening net of scandals. Fallout from these and others yet to be named should continue to generate headlines for the foreseeable future. (more…)

Private placements and conflicts of interest: do consenting adults need more protection? – COLUMN

By Helen Parry, Thomson Reuters Accelus regulatory intelligence expert. The views expressed are her own.

LONDON, May 16 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) -

“The first private placement memorandum disclosed the possibility that new investors may help pay distributions to old investors but this was not a risk; it was a certainty.” (US Securities and Exchange Commission v Bravata 2011 WL 339458.)

“This disclosure indicates that GSI may invest in securities that are ‘adverse to’ the Hudson investments … Goldman had already determined to keep 100 per cent of the short side of the Hudson CDO.” U.S.  Senate Investigations Subcommittee Levin-Coburn Report on the Financial Crisis.

Dodd-Frank’s hatchet men: SEC & others go after incentive-based compensation

March 8 (Westlaw Business) –  Can Dodd-Frank’s latest anti-risk salvo, a new proposed rule on incentive-based compensation, solve as many questions as it raises? In theory, the idea is a noble one: break the chain of managing for the short-money by curtailing lopsided risks that ultimately soak the taxpayer. But even the SEC and the other agencies involved under the new Dodd-Frank regime admit there will be no shortage of questions.

Section 956 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act lays the groundwork for the regulation of incentive-based compensation. The statute formally rejects the idea that it “require[s] the reporting of the actual compensation of particular individuals;” likewise, the statute’s scheme thus offered does not apply to otherwise covered institutions lacking incentive-based compensation packages. (more…)

COLUMN-Two paths to failure on Dodd-Frank

capitol bldg 2 RTXX2LO_Comp.jpg(Scott McCleskey is a managing editor for the ThomsonReuters Governance, Risk and Compliance unit. The views expressed are his own)

By Scott McCleskey

NEW YORK, Feb. 14 (Complinet) – With all the chest-thumping about U.S. financial reform last year, you would suppose that the regulatory authorities responsible for implementing the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act would now have the political wind at their back.

This is particularly the case given the tight deadline for most of the provisions — on or before the July 21 anniversary of the Act’s enactment. You would be wrong. Both sides of the aisle in Congress have taken or threatened steps which only serve to undermine the process of regulatory reform and leave the market with all the costs and none of the benefits of reform. (more…)

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