Financial Regulatory Forum

Retaliation rate against U.S. company whistleblowers climbs, senior staff affected, survey finds

By Guest Contributor
September 6, 2012

By Julie DiMauro

NEW YORK, Sept. 6 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Retaliation against workplace whistleblowers is rising sharply, expanding into previously safe categories of employees such as senior-level managers and even in workplaces with notably strong ethical cultures, a study found.

Offshore U.S. oversight of derivatives may bolster defenses against JPMorgan-type losses

By Guest Contributor
May 29, 2012

By Nick Paraskeva

NEW YORK, May 29 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – U.S. regulators are looking to use new their oversight authority over foreign derivatives trades to reduce the chances of new shocks such as JPMorgan Chase & Co’s trading loss of at least $2 billion.

Companies should use metrics to defend themselves from Dodd-Frank whistleblower claims, report says

By Guest Contributor
March 5, 2012

By Emmanuel Olaoye

NEW YORK, March 5 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Companies in the United States should focus on implementing performance metrics to defend themselves from whistleblower claims and to prevent misconduct within the company, according to a report from consultancy PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Global regulation 2011: a review of policies that shaped the business world

By Guest Contributor
January 10, 2012

Jan. 10 (Business Law Currents) — Global regulators have been anything but idle in 2011. Predictably, the U.S. regulatory landscape was dominated by the 800-lb. statutory gorilla, the Dodd-Frank Act. Canada busied itself trying to accommodate Basel III’s coming capital requirements. Anti-bribery regulation managed to elbow its way into UK headlines in spite of a phone hacking scandal and a royal wedding. China cracked down on loopholes for variable interest entities, while Australia’s new tax regime found few friends in the mining sector down under. (more…)

U.S. financial services can expect more Dodd-Frank in 2012, not less

By Guest Contributor
December 16, 2011

By Rachel Wolcott

NEW YORK, Dec.16 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – When congressman Barney Frank announced he would not seek another term, enemies were quick to predict the demise of the wide-ranging financial reform act that the Massachusetts Democrat penned with former Connecticut Senator Chris Dodd. These pronouncements are not just premature, but according to regulatory experts, probably wrong. Unless there is a real seismic political shift to the right after the 2012 elections, they say, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act 2010 will survive, perhaps with a little tinkering, and firms had better be prepared to deal with it.

Delay in U.S. consumer bureau authority spares non-bank lenders

By Guest Contributor
July 21, 2011

By Ted Knutson

WASHINGTON, July 21 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – A political stalemate over the consumer protection bureau created under the Dodd-Frank financial regulation overhaul is allowing payday loan firms and other non-bank lenders to escape the agency’s authority for now, but industry participants say they have nonetheless boosted lending and disclosure standards.

The Rajaratnam Verdict: Tip of the Iceberg – ANALYSIS

May 18, 2011

NEW YORK, May 18 (Business Law Currents) – The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s trophy case gets a new addition with the conviction of Raj Rajaratnam, but shelf room is still available.

Private placements and conflicts of interest: do consenting adults need more protection? – COLUMN

By Guest Contributor
May 16, 2011

By Helen Parry, Thomson Reuters Accelus regulatory intelligence expert. The views expressed are her own.

Dodd-Frank’s hatchet men: SEC & others go after incentive-based compensation

By Guest Contributor
March 9, 2011

March 8 (Westlaw Business) –  Can Dodd-Frank’s latest anti-risk salvo, a new proposed rule on incentive-based compensation, solve as many questions as it raises? In theory, the idea is a noble one: break the chain of managing for the short-money by curtailing lopsided risks that ultimately soak the taxpayer. But even the SEC and the other agencies involved under the new Dodd-Frank regime admit there will be no shortage of questions.

COLUMN-Two paths to failure on Dodd-Frank

By Guest Contributor
February 14, 2011

capitol bldg 2 RTXX2LO_Comp.jpg(Scott McCleskey is a managing editor for the ThomsonReuters Governance, Risk and Compliance unit. The views expressed are his own)