Financial Regulatory Forum

Regulators release public portions of resolution plans for smaller banks

By Guest Contributor
January 16, 2014

By Bora Yagiz, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Jan. 16 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – The Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) released the public portions of resolution plansfor 116 institutions that submitted plans for the first time in December 2013, a group comprising smaller banks affected by Dodd-Frank requirements for winding-up plans.

FDIC adds more flesh to “single point of entry” resolution plans, but questions remain

By Guest Contributor
December 18, 2013

By Henry Engler, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Dec. 18 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, under mounting pressure from the industry for greater clarity, announced on Tuesday additional details on its “Single Point of Entry” resolution plans for failed banks.
The basic concept is to close the holding company of a failed firm, and transfer its healthy subsidiaries into a new bridge institution that could be managed while the resolution of the defunct company proceeds. Shareholders would be wiped out under the plan, while unsecured creditors could seek equity claims as a means to recapitalize the new institution. Should the subsidiaries require liquidity to operate, they would borrow from the bridge, which in turn may borrow from an “orderly liquidation fund” funded by the U.S. Treasury. (more…)

JPMorgan’s massive spending on controls underlines “aggressive” relations with regulators

By Guest Contributor
September 24, 2013

By Henry Engler, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Sept. 24 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - What was once a more consultative relationship between JPMorgan and its regulators has turned into an environment of aggressive demands to reshape the banking giant, say bankers.

U.S. regulators’ Basel III rules package signals intent to maintain momentum in big-bank reforms

By Guest Contributor
July 17, 2013

By Bora Yagiz

NEW YORK, July 17 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - In a move considered to be the most complete overhaul of U.S. bank capital standards since Basel I in 1988, three U.S. banking regulators (the Federal Reserve Board, Office of Comptroller of the Currency, and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation) have finalized the three Basel III-related notices of proposed rulemaking (NPRs) from 2012 on capital rules.

Basel paper offers new look at bail-in models for ailing institutions

By Guest Contributor
June 12, 2013

By Bora Yagiz, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, June 12 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - A recent Bank for International Settlements (BIS) quarterly review article attempts to solve the too-big-to-fail (TBTF) problem without causing systemic disruption to financial markets, by offering a new resolution template to recapitalize banks on the verge of bankruptcy. It may, however, inadvertently legitimize a de facto bail-in model against the consent of depositors, and put their money at risk.

First wave of U.S. living wills has limitations, but offers useful start

By Guest Contributor
July 9, 2012

By Bora Yagiz

NEW YORK, July 9 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The “living will” resolution plans submitted to U.S. regulators by nine big banks last week suffer from a number of limitations, including narrow scenarios of financial distress and an assumption that regulators will be coordinated in their approach. But there will be plenty of opportunity to perfect the blueprints.

Regulatory round-up — U.S. rules to know in 2012

By Guest Contributor
December 16, 2011

By Nick Paraskeva

NEW YORK, Dec. 16 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – Several recently adopted rules in the U.S. are going into effect for specific types of firms in 2012. These rules include ones released by the Securities and Exchange Commission, Commodity Futures Trading Commission and Federal Reserve, issued to implement the Dodd-Frank Act and as a response to market developments.

from Christopher Whalen:

Did the FDIC really kill the repo market?

June 27, 2011

Back in April 2011, Jim Bianco penned a commentary, “Why The Federal Reserve May Have A Hard Time Raising Rates.” He argued that the increase in the FDIC insurance assessment rate for large banks adds to bank funding costs, and thus offsets the impact of Fed ease. Bianco and others infer a roughly 15bp tax or “wedge” on money market assets is created by the FDIC assessment rule.  By way of reference, the Fed’s target band for fed funds is 0 to 25bp but has been at low end of this range for months.

ANALYSIS-Deck chairs secure aboard USS Financial Regulation

By Reuters Staff
March 22, 2010

By Kevin Drawbaugh

WASHINGTON, March 21 (Reuters) – The big U.S. government agencies in charge of policing banks and markets, despite being excoriated over the severe 2008-2009 financial crisis, have successfully dodged a major structural shake-up.

US FDIC extends protection for securitized assets

March 12, 2010

   By Karey Wutkowski
   WASHINGTON, March 11 (Reuters) – U.S. bank regulators  extended a policy on Thursday that protects securitized assets in the event that a bank fails and is seized by regulators. (more…)