Financial Regulatory Forum

Post-election SEC could emphasize enforcement over rule-writing, says former chair

By Guest Contributor
November 9, 2012

By Emmanuel Olaoye

WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - With the U.S. Congress still politically divided after the elections that returned President Barack Obama to office, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is likely to take an enforcement approach to supervision rather than look to change conduct by writing new rules, former commission chair Harvey Pitt said.

U.S. financial services can expect more Dodd-Frank in 2012, not less

By Guest Contributor
December 16, 2011

By Rachel Wolcott

NEW YORK, Dec.16 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – When congressman Barney Frank announced he would not seek another term, enemies were quick to predict the demise of the wide-ranging financial reform act that the Massachusetts Democrat penned with former Connecticut Senator Chris Dodd. These pronouncements are not just premature, but according to regulatory experts, probably wrong. Unless there is a real seismic political shift to the right after the 2012 elections, they say, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act 2010 will survive, perhaps with a little tinkering, and firms had better be prepared to deal with it.

Four troubling things you didn’t know about financial reform

By Reuters Staff
July 15, 2010

traderworriedThe following is by John Wasik, a columnist for Reuters.com and author of “The Audacity of Help: Obama’s Economic Plan and the Remaking of America.” The opinions expressed are his own.

The best way to handle risk: hedge funds

By Reuters Staff
July 6, 2010

Mockdollar

The following is a guest post by Sebastian Mallaby, the Paul A. Volcker Senior Fellow for International Economics at the Council on Foreign Relations and the author of More Money Than God: Hedge Funds and the Making of a New Elite. The opinions expressed are his own.

from DealZone:

The afternoon deal: Regulation overdrive

June 10, 2010

MOTOR-RACING-NASCAR/A joint Senate-House of Representatives conference committee convened at 2:15 p.m. EDT to begin merging competing bills from each chamber into what will be the biggest overhaul of the financial rules since the 1930s. Columnist John Kemp explains the simple conference process and the not so simple reality of merging the House of Representatives and Senate versions of the financial reform bill. The "base text" for the regulatory bill is here.

from MacroScope:

Spitzer: NY Fed “an absolute sinkhole”

April 14, 2010

To say former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer is no fan of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York would be an understatement.