Financial Regulatory Forum

ACCELUS SUMMIT: Former U.S. SEC chief Pitt warns against imposing regulations abroad, urges industry engagement

By Guest Contributor
May 2, 2013

Nick Paraskeva, for Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, May 2 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – The United States should recognize it can no longer impose its regulatory solutions on the rest of the world, former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission head Harvey Pitt said on Thursday.

New U.S. capital framework may prove burdensome for small banks

By Guest Contributor
June 25, 2012

By Bora Yagiz

NEW YORK, June 25 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - As part of an effort to bring the United States in line with the international standards of Basel III, the Federal Reserve Board, the Office of the Comptroller of Currency (OCC) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), on June 8, 2012, jointly proposed three rules dubbed together as the integrated regulatory capital framework.

Time to merge risk management and compliance?

By Guest Contributor
April 5, 2012

By Rachel Wolcott

LONDON/NEW YORK, April 5 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – Regulators’ rising interest in risk management combined with a long trail of big fines for compliance failures has some consultants and industry leaders wondering whether it is time for the two disciplines to come closer together if not merge completely.

On the other hand: When Woodstock meets Wall Street

By Guest Contributor
November 29, 2011

By Scott McCleskey

Nov. 29 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - If you didn’t know any different, you’d think the Occupy Wall Street movement was the kind of military operation so often criticized by people of a certain political temperament. It started off with a clear mission (financial reform), then suffered from mission creep (economic justice) and it never had an exit strategy. I think there was a surge in there somewhere as well but it’s hard to tell when they all live in tents.

ANALYSIS – U.S. TARP program less costly, but not less controversial

August 20, 2010

By Dave Clarke

WASHINGTON, Aug 19 (Reuters) – The government’s $700 billion bailout of the financial system may still be politically toxic, but for those who voted for the program, there is some good news: the taxpayer bill continues to drop.

ANALYSIS-Financial reform to give Obama limited lift at G20

By Reuters Staff
June 25, 2010

By Caren Bohan

WASHINGTON, June 25 (Reuters) – The win President Barack Obama racked up on U.S. financial regulation reform on Friday will give him a boost at this weekend’s Group of 20 summit in Toronto but probably only a limited one.

PREVIEW-Final act begins in U.S. Congress on Wall St reform

By Reuters Staff
June 7, 2010

By Kevin Drawbaugh

WASHINGTON, June 7 (Reuters) – Negotiators from the U.S. Senate and House will begin meeting this week to craft a final Wall Street reform bill, with banks facing changes that threaten their profits, if not their business models.

PREVIEW-Wall St. reform’s final round in U.S. Senate

By Reuters Staff
May 17, 2010

By Kevin Drawbaugh

WASHINGTON, May 17 (Reuters) – The Wall Street reform fight enters its final stages in the U.S. Senate this week with an overdue reckoning on three issues that cut to the heart of how, and for whom, the financial system works.

ANALYSIS-Franken bill unlikely to make credit ratings more reliable

May 14, 2010

By Karen Brettell

NEW YORK, May 14 (Reuters) – Legislation designed to create more independent credit ratings for risky assets may not result in more reliable indicators of an asset’s future performance and details on how the process would work are still unclear.

Broad swath of CEOs line up against “Wall Street” reform provision – Washington Post

May 14, 2010

The U.S. Senate may call its financial regulatory overhaul a “Wall Street reform bill,” but corporate leaders from across U.S. industry are lining up to oppose one of  its provisions, the Washington Post writes. The newspaper says chief executives are lobbying to kill a “proxy access” provision of the legislation that would make it easier for shareholders to nominate board directors at publicly traded companies, and thus exercise a tighter rein on management.