Financial Regulatory Forum

SEC’s “re-markable” action against Credit Suisse traders

By Guest Contributor
February 10, 2012

By Thomson Reuters Accelus – Staff

NEW YORK, Feb.10 (Business Law Currents) - A new SEC complaint against former Credit Suisse (CS) employees shines a harsh light on an underappreciated aspect of the financial crisis: mark-to-market manipulation. Charging four traders and investment bankers with violating securities laws, the commission’s civil action (“the complaint”) alleges a “colossal fraud” to misstate the value of bonds held in the bank’s portfolio. U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara of the Southern District of New York also filed a criminal indictment against CS investment banker David Higgs, a managing director of the bank’s London office. Bharara likewise filed a criminal information against CS trader Salmaan Siddiqui, who held the title of vice president.

U.S. ‘microcap’ charges highlight debate over small-firm capital raising

By Guest Contributor
December 5, 2011

By Stuart Gittleman

NEW YORK, Dec. 6 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – Federal charges filed last week in a suspected kickback scheme to sell thinly traded stocks highlight concerns over investor safety as Congress making it easier for small business to raise capital. Boston federal prosecutors filed fraud and conspiracy charges last Thursday against 13 people: corporate officers, a lawyer and stock promoter. They were accused of a kickback scheme in which payments hidden by phony consulting contracts were made to an undercover FBI agent, who posed as a hedge-fund representative, in exchange for having the fund buy stock in certain small companies. (more…)

The compliance lessons, so far, arising from the UBS rogue trader

By Guest Contributor
September 23, 2011

LONDON, Sept. 23 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – UBS’s loss of $2.3 billion has hit the headlines worldwide, and while full details of what went wrong are unlikely to be public in the near future there are already compliance lessons for other firms. UK and Swiss regulators have launched an investigation into:

CFTC rules point to crackdown on manipulation: John Kemp

By Reuters Staff
November 10, 2010

– John Kemp is a Reuters market analyst. The views expressed are his own –

from Reuters Investigates:

Morbid money-spinners

September 28, 2010

If the life settlements market seems ghoulish, here’s a British scandal which isn’t doing the image of the business any favours. It’s one of the worst the country’s seen.

Paulson reassures clients on Goldman deal, no exits yet

April 21, 2010

FINANCIAL/   By Svea Herbst-Bayliss
   BOSTON, April 20 (Reuters) – Clients with Paulson & Co, which was involved in a mortgage deal that prompted civil fraud charges against Goldman Sachs <GS.N>, spoke with the manager on Monday, but so far no one has notified the firm of plans to leave his fund, several investors said. (more…)

UK’s Brown wants investigation into Goldman Sachs

April 18, 2010

   By Adrian Croft
   LONDON, April 18 (Reuters) – Prime Minister Gordon Brown said on Sunday he wanted Britain’s financial watchdog to investigate U.S. bank Goldman Sachs <GS.N> after it was charged with fraud by U.S. regulators. (more…)

US Senate panel: high-risk loans brought down WaMu

April 13, 2010

   By Dan Margolies
   WASHINGTON, April 12 (Reuters) -  Despite fraud rates of over 58 percent and 83 percent at two of Washington Mutual Bank’s top-producing loan production offices in 2005, the bank did nothing to address the problem, according to findings released Monday by a congressional panel. (more…)

New York charges Bank of America, ex-CEO with fraud; SEC settles

By Reuters Staff
February 5, 2010

By Jonathan Stempel and Joe Rauch

NEW YORK/ORLANDO, Fla., Feb 4 (Reuters) – New York’s attorney general charged Bank of America Corp former Chief Executive Kenneth Lewis and former Chief Financial Officer Joe Price with fraud for allegedly misleading shareholders about the acquisition of Merrill Lynch & Co.

SocGen scandal prompts EU bank watchdog crackdown

By Reuters Staff
December 21, 2009

LONDON, Dec 21 (Reuters) – European Union bank supervisors unveiled draft guidelines on Monday to apply lessons from a trading scandal that forced Societe Generale to book billions of euros in losses.