Financial Regulatory Forum

Goldman standards review reflects new compliance landscape

By Guest Contributor
May 30, 2013

By Nick Paraskeva, for Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, May 29 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Goldman Sachs’ report on new business ethics and practices voiced lofty ambitions that are both frequently aired and difficult to implement. But it also articulated higher standards on issues such as reputational risk, suitability and conflicts of interests, which are increasingly demanded by customers, regulators and investors.

Gupta insider case puts focus on monitoring board members, financial-crisis challenges

By Guest Contributor
June 18, 2012

Rajat GuptaBy Julie DiMauro and Stuart Gittleman

NEW YORK, June 18 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The insider-trading conviction of Rajat Gupta, a former McKinsey group chairman and a-list board member, had federal prosecutors and securities regulators glowing. But companies face stiff challenges protecting their boards from breaches confidentiality by directors and the reputational and other damages that ensue, consultants and lawyers said.

Private placements and conflicts of interest: do consenting adults need more protection? – COLUMN

By Guest Contributor
May 16, 2011

By Helen Parry, Thomson Reuters Accelus regulatory intelligence expert. The views expressed are her own.

SEC’s boardroom bombshell: directors can be costly

By Guest Contributor
March 4, 2011

Traders work in the Goldman Sachs stall on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange July 16, 2010.  REUTERS/Brendan McDermidNEW YORK, March 4 (Westlaw Business) Being an insider with a fiduciary duty sure is risky, as heavyweight Rajat Gupta is now finding out amidst serious SEC charges. So is having board members, as Goldman Sachs and Procter and Gamble are now worrying. Of great concern to each are the reputational risks and attendant costs that this might impose on them. The potential risks could relate to a broad range of issues, ranging from inside information, to disclosure of SEC investigation and board member protection. Though this likelihood may seem remote, recent experiences from Bank of America to Goldman Sachs itself show them to be painfully possible.

ANALYSIS-New U.S. funds regulator at SEC must shed Goldman skin

By Reuters Staff
January 20, 2011

The headquarters of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) are seen in Washington, July 6, 2009. REUTERS/Jim Bourg (UNITED STATES BUSINESS POLITICS)By Ross Kerber and Sarah N. Lynch

BOSTON/WASHINGTON, Jan 19 (Reuters) – For U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Mary Schapiro, the choice of a Goldman Sachs Group  insider as her new top funds regulator could be a double-edged sword.

ANALYSIS-Goldman foe gets some revenge in reform bill

By Reuters Staff
June 29, 2010

By Matthew Goldstein

NEW YORK, June 28 (Reuters) – One of the sleeper provisions in the 2,000-page financial regulatory reform bill may be one that is no more than six paragraphs long.

ANALYSIS-Wall Street still in the hedge fund game

By Reuters Staff
June 27, 2010

By Svea Herbst-Bayliss and Matthew Goldstein

BOSTON/NEW YORK, June 25 (Reuters) – It appears Wall Street investment banks can stay in the highly-profitable hedge fund business after all.

from DealZone:

The afternoon deal: Regulation overdrive

June 10, 2010

MOTOR-RACING-NASCAR/A joint Senate-House of Representatives conference committee convened at 2:15 p.m. EDT to begin merging competing bills from each chamber into what will be the biggest overhaul of the financial rules since the 1930s. Columnist John Kemp explains the simple conference process and the not so simple reality of merging the House of Representatives and Senate versions of the financial reform bill. The "base text" for the regulatory bill is here.

ANALYSIS-Goldman silence on probe a model others will avoid?

By Reuters Staff
June 7, 2010

By Matthew Goldstein and Steve Eder

NEW YORK, June 4 (Reuters) – The decision of Goldman Sachs Group Inc not to tell shareholders that U.S. regulators might sue the bank over a subprime mortgage-linked security could cause other companies to rethink the way they handle regulatory investigations.

Goldman Getting Ahead of Bad News?

May 5, 2010

Goldman Sachs’s disclosure pendulum appears to have now sharply swung in the other direction, Matthew Merrin of Thomson Reuters Westlaw Business Currents writes. (more…)