Financial Regulatory Forum

The Einhorn effect? How the FSA’s authority might be undermined by vocal unrepentant sinners

By Guest Contributor
February 23, 2012

By Peter Elstob

LONDON/NEW YORK, Feb. 23 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – Britain’s Financial Services Authority (FSA) could see its credibility undermined as individuals with deep pockets choose not to challenge fines, instead paying up but then publicly criticising the regulator, a leading regulatory lawyer has warned. “I think it will be interesting to see whether … individuals and firms decide, for good commercial reasons, not to challenge cases, but to either settle them or to leave them uncontested, but then to comment rather adversely on the FSA’s process and finding,” said Helen Marshall, a former senior FSA enforcement official and now a partner at Bingham McCutchen LLP.  (more…)

Einhorn/Greenlight Capital fine highlights duty for investors to seek absolute clarity over inside information

By Guest Contributor
January 26, 2012

By Martin Coyle and Alex Robson

LONDON/NEW YORK, (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – A decision by the UK Financial Services Authority (FSA) to fine hedge fund manager David Einhorn and his Greenlight Capital fund 7.3 million pounds ($11.5 million) has highlighted the need for professional investors to ascertain clearly what constitutes inside information, securities lawyers said. The FSA said that it fined Einhorn 3.64 million pounds and Greenlight Capital 3.65 million pounds for using inside information that he obtained from a broker before selling shares in a UK public company in 2009. Einhorn’s is the biggest scalp by far of the FSA’s renewed determination to punish market manipulation as part of its “credible deterrence” policy.