Financial Regulatory Forum

from MacroScope:

A “Greed Tax” on banks

April 21, 2010

The International Monetary Fund has done what it was bid by the G20  and come up with proposals for getting banks to pay for the government help they receive when they get in trouble.  You can read the actual wording here, but it comes down to this:

SCENARIOS – G20 efforts to agree on a bank levy

By Reuters Staff
March 31, 2010

By Huw Jones

LONDON, March 31 (Reuters) – France backed Germany’s plans for a bank levy on Wednesday to boost momentum for a global deal among the G20 group of leading countries later this year.

EXCLUSIVE – IMF exploring insurance levy on banks

By Reuters Staff
November 9, 2009

By Brian Love
PARIS, Nov 8 (Reuters) – The International Monetary Fund is exploring the idea of making banks pay insurance fees to fund any future rescues in the sector, IMF managing director Dominique Strauss-Kahn said on Sunday.

UK gives impetus to global banks tax, U.S. doubtful

By Reuters Staff
November 8, 2009

Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown addresses the G20 Finance Ministers meeting at a hotel in St. Andrews, Scotland November 7, 2009. A tax on financial transactions to fund future bank bailouts should be considered with urgency, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown told G20 policymakers on Saturday, a significant departure from London's line to date.      REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN BUSINESS POLITICS)   By Huw Jones
ST ANDREWS, Scotland, Nov 7 (Reuters) – Britain urged world governments on Saturday to consider a levy on banks to fund future bailouts, departing from long-held opposition, though there was little sign of the consensus needed to make it fly.

G20 ministers to keep stimulus, seek ways to coordinate economies

By Reuters Staff
November 6, 2009

Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Alistair Darling speaks at a Thomson Reuters newsmaker event in London October 21, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN BUSINESS POLITICS)   By Sumeet Desai
ST ANDREWS, Scotland, Nov 6 (Reuters) – The Group of 20 leading nations will agree this weekend it is too early to pull the plug on emergency support for the global economy and launch a new system of checks to help rebalance world growth and prevent future crises.

India buys half of IMF’s gold for sale; who’s next?

By Reuters Staff
November 3, 2009

A bride wearing gold ornaments sits before taking her marriage vows during a mass wedding ceremony in New Delhi October 29, 2009. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi     By Surojit Gupta and Lesley Wroughton
MUMBAI/WASHINGTON, Nov 3 (Reuters) – The International Monetary Fund has sold 200 tonnes of gold to the Reserve Bank of India for $6.7 billion, quietly executing half of a long-planned bullion sale. The deal fuelled speculation that other governments — including China — may be ready to diversify their reserves even at near-record gold prices.

IMF approves Iceland review, to disburse $167.5 mln

By Reuters Staff
October 29, 2009

By Lesley Wroughton
WASHINGTON, Oct 28 (Reuters) – The International Monetary Fund on Wednesday approved a long-delayed review of Iceland’s economic performance under an IMF loan program and said the crisis-hit economy could begin to turn the corner by the middle of next year.

France, China worry about U.S. dollar weakness

By Reuters Staff
October 20, 2009

By Gertrude Chavez-Dreyfuss and Emmanuel Jarry
NEW YORK/PARIS, Oct 20 (Reuters) – France said on Tuesday the euro at $1.50 was a disaster for Europe and joined China in worrying that a weak U.S. dollar would stoke inflation.

Iceland says has new repayment deal with UK, Holland over deposit losses

October 19, 2009

Iceland's Prime Minister Johanna Sigurdardottir smiles before a vote on the controversial "Icesave bill" in Reykjavik August 28, 2009. (File Photo) REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson By Omar Valdimarsson
REYKJAVIK, Oct 18 (Reuters) – Iceland said on Sunday it had agreed to a new deal to repay Britain and the Netherlands billions of dollars of deposits lost when the island’s banks collapsed in 2008, paving the way for new aid from international lenders.
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EU central banker Noyer wants more balanced currency system

By Reuters Staff
October 13, 2009

European Central Bank board of governors member and Bank of France Governor Christian Noyer, June 25, 2009. (File Photo)  REUTERS/Benoit Tessier ROUEN, France, Oct 13 (Reuters) – Having a more balanced world currency system is a good idea but Special Drawing Rights are not an instrument that can replace the U.S. dollar, ECB governing council member Christian Noyer said on Tuesday.