By Emmanuel Olaoye, Compliance Complete

The Securities and Exchange Commission has rolled out its intentions to regulate high-frequency trading, making stricter regulation in some form a strong possibility, but the agency faces more work and some challenging obstacles before it can put new rules in the books.

SEC Chair Mary Jo White in a speech last week outlined her goals for regulating high-frequency trading (HFT), at a time when political interest over the fairness and risks of the practice has surged in the wake of a best-selling book by financial writer Michael Lewis.

White‘s intentions for regulating high-frequency trading, which has taken a dominant role in U.S. equity markets, include registration requirements for proprietary fast-traders. Under such rules, firms registering as broker dealers would have to meet net capital requirements and establish adequate risk management controls.

The agency is also working on a rule to restrict disruptive trading rule. The rule would apply to proprietary traders in “short time periods when liquidity is most vulnerable and the risk of price disruption caused by aggressive short-term trading strategies is highest.”

The initiatives sound good on the surface but the SEC needs to work out the details, said Bernard Donefer, a professor of information systems in financial markets at Baruch College in New York. This includes learning more about the trading strategies of HFT firms before forcing them to register.