Financial Regulatory Forum

JPMorgan’s massive spending on controls underlines “aggressive” relations with regulators

By Henry Engler, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Sept. 24 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - What was once a more consultative relationship between JPMorgan and its regulators has turned into an environment of aggressive demands to reshape the banking giant, say bankers.

With news the largest U.S. bank has settled one set of charges for $920 million and is bracing for more legal and regulatory scrutiny in the coming weeks and months, insiders say the most noticeable change has been the regulators’ use of “consent orders” to enforce wholesale changes across the institution’s risk management controls and systems. (more…)

U.S. financial regulation has gaps in risk oversight, insurance, infrastructure, global stability board finds

By Nick Paraskeva, Compliance Complete contributing author

NEW YORK, Sept 3. (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – A Financial Stability Board (FSB) peer review of U.S. regulation found gaps in oversight of systemic risk, insurance firms and financial infrastructure.

The report called on the United States to develop the Treasury-led oversight council into a “systematic, analytical and transparent macroprudential framework” that better coordinates the work of its member regulators. The 10 agency heads in Financial Stability Oversight Council have not always seen eye to eye. (more…)

U.S. Justice Department chooses former prosecutor to be HSBC compliance monitor

By Brett Wolf, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, June 6 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The U.S. Justice Department on Wednesday said it has chosen a former New York County prosecutor who is known for his innovative pursuit of criminals to police HSBC’s efforts to clean up its anti-money laundering program.

The Department’s decision to announce its choice at a time when a federal judge’s hesitation to sign-off on its settlement with HSBC has raised questions over the settlement’s prospects suggests the move is an attempt to win the judge’s approval, compliance experts said. (more…)

U.S. class-action securities settlements fewer but more costly in 2012 after IPO slump, credit crisis; Libor looms

By Stuart Gittleman, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Mar. 26 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Court-approved securities class action settlements reported in 2012 were at a 14-year low and 18 percent fewer than in 2011 but they cost defendants twice as much as the prior year, a report released Wednesday said.

The study by the Stanford Law School Securities Class Action Clearinghouse and Cornerstone Research associated settlement values with factors including the presence of enforcement actions related to the lawsuits. This may hold clues to the outcomes in recently litigation over alleged manipulation of the global lending benchmark LIBOR, the London Interbank Offered Rate.  (more…)

Dos and don’ts on handling a regulatory investigation

By Stuart Gittleman, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Dec. 21 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - A “highly polarized (and) politicized environment” had made the job of defending against a regulatory investigation particularly challenging, Lawrence Zweifach, a Gibson Dunn law partner, told attendees at a New York City Bar Association program last week. But there are steps a firm can to take to face the challenges.

The high-pressured atmosphere is affecting judges, regulators and legislators, and leading to cases “that will not stand up in the long run” to be brought, said Andrew Levander, a Dechert law partner. (more…)

Shorter securities settlements cycles to be introduced in Europe

By Marianne Brown, Thomson Reuters Accelus contributor

LONDON, Dec. 19 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – Earlier this year, the European Commission published its proposals for the regulation of central securities depositories (CSDs), the entities that operate settlement systems. The proposals, known as the Central Securities Depositories Regulation (CSDR), seek to improve settlement efficiency across European markets, and are currently working their way through the European Parliament and Council. (more…)

Global firms facing challenges of shifting regulations, their top lawyers say

By Stuart Gittleman, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Dec. 13 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The “shifting sands” of regulation, especially since the onset of the financial crisis, are making it more challenging for U.S. public companies to conduct global operations, the top lawyers for three such companies said Friday.

The general counsels – Andrew Bonzani of Interpublic Group, Peter J. Ganz of Ashland Inc. and Elizabeth M. Sacksteder of Citigroup – spoke at the Institute for Corporate Counsel, which was cosponsored by Thomson Reuters and the New York City Bar Association. (more…)

Post-election SEC could emphasize enforcement over rule-writing, says former chair

By Emmanuel Olaoye

WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - With the U.S. Congress still politically divided after the elections that returned President Barack Obama to office, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is likely to take an enforcement approach to supervision rather than look to change conduct by writing new rules, former commission chair Harvey Pitt said.

A divided Congress, he said, would struggle to check an SEC that turned to enforcement actions to implement policies it saw as in keeping with the Dodd-Frank Act.

“If you’ve got a split Congress, effectively it means that Congress’s principal weapon (against a regulator) will be holding hearings … That is a lot less of a potent weapon than the notions that if Congress doesn’t like what you do, they may pass a law that curtails your ability to do what you’ve been doing.”

Weak U.S. legal oversight puts burden on compliance pros to protect their firms, author says

By Stuart Gittleman

NEW YORK, Sept. 4 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - An inadequate government and industry response to the financial crisis will require compliance professionals to do more to protect their firms, customers and colleagues, Jeff Connaughton, who said he saw firsthand how reform withered in Congress, has told Compliance Complete.

“Until law enforcement causes actual deterrence, compliance needs to understand what institutional and retail customers can – and can’t – stomach. And those customers need to get back to performing exacting due diligence. Until we have tough law enforcement again, institutional customers will have a greater impact on Wall Street behavior than federal prosecutors,” said Connaughton, a former investment banker, aide in President Bill Clinton’s administration, lobbyist and longtime political associate of Vice President Joe Biden. (more…)

Learn the compliance lessons from an epic fail in correspondent banking and trade finance

By Kim R. Manchester, Thomson Reuters Accelus contributing author

NEW YORK, July 16 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - A Settlement Agreement was released in June 2012 by the United States Department of the Treasury regarding the voluntary self-disclosure to the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) by ING Bank, N.V. (ING Bank), a financial institution registered and organized in the Netherlands. The violations of numerous sanctions programs imposed by the United States against Cuba, Burma, the Sudan, Libya and Iran were determined by the Americans as “egregious.” (more…)

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