– John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own –

By John Kemp

LONDON, March 23 (Reuters) – Managing the rise of China’s vast economy and healing the U.S. trade deficit will require a new willingness and capacity to boost U.S. technology exports at affordable prices. More importantly it requires a new language from policymakers and a new mindset.

In a recent survey of American businesses, the proportion who felt unwelcome operating in China had risen sharply, amid tense stand offs involving Rio Tinto and Google. But with U.S. legislators in full flag-waving cry about China as a currency manipulator, is it really surprising China is looking to become more self-reliant?

At the heart of the trade problem is the difficulty the United States (and other western economies) are experiencing in adjusting to China’s rise to superpower status in the 21st century. It is causing the same problems the rise of Germany, Japan and the United States itself caused for Britain in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Until now most analysts have focused on destabilising military aspects of that competition and the need to prevent a re-run. But almost equally important were tensions in the industrial sphere.