Financial Regulatory Forum

BNP’s ‘huge’ role in undermining U.S. Sudan sanctions behind looming tough penalty, sources say

June 19, 2014
By Brett Wolf, Compliance Complete ST. LOUIS, June 18 – The pivotal role BNP Paribas played in helping Sudan sell oil in violation of U.S. sanctions is the major reason U.S. authorities are pushing for harsh penalties against the French banking giant, two sources with firsthand knowledge of the matter said.”BNP basically was the Sudanese economy. They were just huge in helping the government of Sudan evade U.S. sanctions,” one of the sources said.BNP’s role involved removing references to Sudanese parties from wire-transfer messages, so U.S. dollar oil payments could clear through New York and move into accounts controlled by Khartoum, the sources said. The sources declined to name the buyers of the Sudanese oil or to say what Khartoum did with the revenue.

U.S. broker-dealers scrutinized for anti-laundering compliance in Venezuelan currency swaps

By Guest Contributor
November 13, 2012

By Brett Wolf

NEW YORK, Nov. 13 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - Securities industry regulators are beginning to ask U.S. broker-dealers tough questions about how they are mitigating money laundering and sanctions risks associated with their involvement in a 2-year-old currency exchange system run by the Venezuelan government, sources familiar with the issue said.

Financial cybercrime a national security threat, U.S. Justice Department official warns

By Guest Contributor
September 21, 2012

By Julie DiMauro and Stuart Gittleman

NEW YORK, Sept. 21 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - U.S.-based financial services institutions that don’t tell law enforcement agencies about having been victimized by cybercrime are compromising the nation’s security as well as that of their firms, a top Department of Justice official warned this week.

U.S. Justice Department targeting shop landlords in fight against medical marijuana industry

By Guest Contributor
June 12, 2012

By Brett Wolf

NEW YORK, June 12 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - A civil statute designed primarily to seize the assets of drug trafficking organizations is now being wielded by federal prosecutors in California in an unconventional and little-noticed attack on medical-marijuana shops in the state.

U.S. tax guilty plea involves unspecified major UK bank, Zurich banker

By Reuters Staff
February 16, 2010

By Kim Dixon

ALEXANDRIA, Va., Feb 16 (Reuters) – A U.S. client of a big global bank based in England pleaded guilty to conspiracy in connection with assets stashed abroad to evade taxes, part of a widening crackdown on foreign banks and their customers.

Swiss minister says US insists on UBS tax deal – paper

By Reuters Staff
February 11, 2010

ZURICH, Feb 11 (Reuters) – The Swiss government will probably have to turn to parliament to resolve a legal impasse threatening a deal struck with the United States to hand over data from UBS AG clients, a minister was quoted as saying.

Swiss minister sees economic risk in U.S. tax dispute over UBS, shares fall

By Reuters Staff
February 1, 2010

By Lisa Jucca

ZURICH, Feb 1 (Reuters) - Shares in UBS AG fell to a 6-1/2 month low on Monday after the justice minister underscored the risk to the Swiss economy should the bank’s settlement of a U.S. tax dispute unravel.

ANALYSIS-Banks not out of woods after Swiss tax ruling

By Reuters Staff
January 29, 2010

By Kim Dixon

WASHINGTON, Jan 29 (Reuters) – The Swiss court ruling in favor of a U.S. client who stashed funds in a UBS account sets a higher hurdle to aggressive efforts by the U.S. government to go after other banks helping wealthy tax cheats — but the banks are not out of the woods yet.

Swiss government moves to save UBS tax deal

By Reuters Staff
January 27, 2010

BERNE, Jan 27 (Reuters) – The Swiss government is to talk to the U.S. authorities in a bid to resolve a legal impasse that has threatened to derail a key tax deal over UBS client data, it said on Wednesday.

U.S. sanctions-violation fine for Credit Suisse raises Iran alarm

By Reuters Staff
December 16, 2009

By Lisa Jucca and Steve Slater

ZURICH/LONDON, Dec 16 (Reuters) – A surprise $536 million settlement by Credit Suisse to a U.S. probe over financial dealings with Iran should only do short-term damage to the Swiss bank, but others could now be in the line of fire.