David Sokol, Chairman, MidAmerican Energy Holdings, and Chairman, President, and CEO of NetJets, listens to a question during the Fortune Brainstorm Green conference in Dana Point, California in this April 13, 2010 file photograph. Former Berkshire Hathaway executive David Sokol has said he did nothing wrong in buying stock in a company that he then suggested Berkshire acquire.By Erik Krusch

NEW YORK  (Business Law Currents) Inside information seems to be making its way out of the office and boardroom and onto the Street where it is parlayed into lucrative stock trades. From former hedge fund mogul Raj Rajaratnam to erstwhile Berkshire Hathaway executive and reputed Warren Buffett successor David Sokol, individuals alleged to have traded on inside information are sweating in the proverbial hot seat.

Rajaratnam’s alleged violation of insider trading laws and Sokol’s alleged violation of Berkshire policy, and possibly state and federal law, are helping to shape current market norms and the future behavior of investors in U.S. capital markets. These corporate dramas are unfolding before our very eyes and today’s events offer a possible window into what post-Sokol and Rajaratnam corporate policy and insider trading enforcement may look like.

(more…)