Chief Correspondent, Reuters Spain
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Jun 18, 2013

Spanish royal tax fraud case founders on mistaken identity

MADRID (Reuters) – A fraud investigation of Spain’s Princess Cristina was thrown into disarray on Tuesday when the Tax Agency said it had been mistaken in reporting she had been the seller of 1.4 million euros ($1.87 million) worth of properties.

Cristina, daughter of King Juan Carlos, is under investigation for alleged tax fraud as part of a wider corruption probe against her husband, Inaki Urdangarin, who is charged with embezzling 6 million euros of public funds.

Jun 4, 2013

Spain’s parliament calls time on subsidised cocktails

MADRID (Reuters) – A refreshing gin and tonic may have been just what Spanish members of parliament needed after sessions grappling with unemployment, street protests, a sinking economy and other problems.

But the subsidised cocktails at the parliament’s cafeterias stirred up outrage amongst the suffering Spanish public,

May 27, 2013

Insight: The maverick challenging Spanish politics

MADRID (Reuters) – Spain’s rising political star is a 61-year-old former Socialist whose message of changing the system from within is drawing voters in despair at economic ruin and official corruption in the euro zone’s fourth biggest economy.

Lacking the raucous anti-establishment appeal of Italy’s Beppe Grillo and Greek leftist hero Alexis Tsipras, Rosa Diez relies on sharp debate to deliver her reform message to a country pushed to the brink by the euro zone debt crisis.

May 27, 2013

The maverick challenging Spanish politics

MADRID, May 27 (Reuters) – Spain’s rising political star is
a 61-year-old former Socialist whose message of changing the
system from within is drawing voters in despair at economic ruin
and official corruption in the euro zone’s fourth biggest
economy.

Lacking the raucous anti-establishment appeal of Italy’s
Beppe Grillo and Greek leftist hero Alexis Tsipras, Rosa Diez
relies on sharp debate to deliver her reform message to a
country pushed to the brink by the euro zone debt crisis.

May 8, 2013

Spain’s Rajoy balks at making deeper reforms

MADRID (Reuters) – After a year of radical reforms that made Spain more competitive but also exacerbated a deep recession, Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has largely lost his appetite for aggressive and unpopular cuts to pensions or state bureaucracy.

His plunging approval rating at home is holding him back as unemployment soars to 27 percent. Sources within the government say he has also reached the view that deeper reforms at home will win him few points in negotiations with European partners.

Apr 22, 2013

Spain’s population falls as immigrants flee crisis

MADRID (Reuters) – Spain’s official population fell last year for the first time since the 1940s as immigrants fled a five-year on-and-off recession that has sent unemployment soaring.

The number of residents fell by 206,000 to 47.1 million, the National Statistics Institute said on Monday, a figure entirely accounted for by the fall in the number of registered foreign residents.

Apr 15, 2013

Alleged HSBC data thief in extradition hearing in Spain

MADRID (Reuters) – A former HSBC employee wanted in Switzerland on allegations of stealing data on tens of thousands of bank accounts came before a Spanish court on Monday for extradition proceedings, arguing he was a whistleblower fighting corruption.

The data caused a furore in 2010 when it ended up in the hands of tax authorities in France, Italy, Spain and other European countries, which have used it to seek to recover billions of euros in lost taxes.

Apr 11, 2013

A hit TV show rises from the ashes of Spain’s crisis

BARCELONA, Spain, April 11 (Reuters) – Every Sunday evening
up to 4.3 million people in Spain tune into a quirky but
hard-hitting news show that has become an unlikely television
success as crisis-plagued Spaniards try to figure out how their
country got into the mess it is in.

On “Salvados”, which means “Saved” in English, journalist
Jordi Evole, 38, asks experts and ordinary people disarmingly
simple questions to explain the costly bailout of Spain’s banks
or the looming hole in the pension system.

Apr 4, 2013

Spaniards lose patience with rotten institutions

MADRID (Reuters) – When a corruption scandal hit Spain’s ruling party earlier this year, attention turned to the Accounts Tribunal, an obscure body that audits public spending.

Surely this independent institution, with an annual budget of $78 million and 800 workers, could shed light on allegations in the media that a former treasurer for the People’s Party had run a slush fund from party headquarters.

Mar 30, 2013
via FaithWorld

Spain’s Holy Week parades thrive despite falling Catholic faith

Photo

(A penitent of “La Lanzada” brotherhood walks to a church to start his penance during Holy Week in the Andalusian capital of Seville, southern Spain, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo)

It is 1 a.m. on Good Friday and thousands of people hush their chatter in Seville’s Duque Plaza. A cloud of incense is the only sign of what approaches.

    • About Fiona

      "Fiona Ortiz is Reuters' chief correspondent for Spain. She has also lived and worked as a journalist in Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala and Portland, Oregon."
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