Comments on: Twittering away standards or tweeting the future of journalism? http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/ Dean Wright on Ethics, Innovation and Values Sun, 08 Apr 2012 05:10:49 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Jstock http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-2/#comment-1263 Mon, 29 Mar 2010 17:23:48 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-1263 I don’t see Twitter as the future place to find news. I don’t see my grandma sitting down at the computer and tweeting about her day. I think journalist need to stick to print media and online newspapers, not facebook and twitter.

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By: opensmart http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-2/#comment-655 Wed, 24 Jun 2009 10:10:11 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-655 I think it will be a cause for future o f journalism,bcz views of people their opinions are shared here not major news

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By: Pascal Taillandier http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-1/#comment-308 Mon, 02 Feb 2009 12:03:29 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-308 An interesting question seen… on Twitter: “is tweeting breaking an embargo?”

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By: VeriaBlade http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-1/#comment-306 Mon, 02 Feb 2009 05:29:42 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-306 What about those who use blogging merely to give themselves some purchase in an intellectual maelstrom such as their lives?

Wouldn’t that immediately give journalists who represent themselves as ‘bloggers’ an immediate reputation loss, being associated with irrelevant information sources?

I must say, I know many a person, including myself, who naturally distrust blog posts as being too pretentious, or as you say, unintermediated between an Editor who can evaluate for communicative consistency and coherency … I suppose it places a very high demand on the blogger itself, but realistically speaking, won’t the mere association with irrelevant bloggers (ljers you could say) cause Blogging to be a form of media to steer away from when reporting our daily issues?

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By: Ahmed Azhar http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-1/#comment-303 Mon, 02 Feb 2009 02:24:14 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-303 What most people will take away from this episode is that Reuters’ editor-in-chief tweeted from Davos. Practically no one will recall what he tweeted (or allegedly scooped the Reuters wire) about. Which raises two interesting questions. One, when the reporter becomes a bigger story than the story he is purportedly covering, what exactly is going on? Is this where a fact-based news gathering organization like Reuters wants to be, or sees its future? And two, if, as opposed to a pointless panel discussion and “crepuscular” Alpine dawns (shurely shome mishtake? Ed), the reporter had witnessed something really consequential and unexpected like (irate delegate pulls gun and fires at Davos panel), would he have tweeted the shootout or call the desk to dictate a snap? Somehow, the latter sounds more likely.

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By: Kalena Jordan http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-1/#comment-300 Sun, 01 Feb 2009 10:15:27 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-300 As the author of an article about how social media is impacting CNN and being on the receiving end of a lot of skepticism and flack for that article, I was absolutely delighted to see this piece from you today. It confirms my suspicions that the very nature of journalism is changing and social media is providing the democratisation of which you speak. Thank you for being one of the loudest voices to embrace the change and not allow the stuffed shirts of journalism past to censor your true opinion.

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By: David Petherick http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-1/#comment-298 Sat, 31 Jan 2009 16:03:18 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-298 Excellent article David – and I agree that consumers of news will be the beneficiaries.

I think it’s absolutely right to link using tools like Twitter to Reuters’ Trust Principles as you have, and it’s heartening to see your attitude to this issue.

Everyone producing news must add value, and “expand, develop and adapt”.

Thanks for sharing this – but I didn’t catch your twitter name here! I’ve had my twitter name on my business card for over a year now – it’ll be interesting to see how many news organisations add such detail to sites and stationery come 2010.

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By: zingaralla http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-1/#comment-295 Sat, 31 Jan 2009 11:50:35 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-295 I find this statement quite interesting: “I am not one (a journalist) because I am somehow anointed with a certificate or an exam result.”

I take it that you didn’t go to journalism school — I certainly wasn’t annointed with either of my degrees. I had to work hard to earn them.

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By: Stilgherrian http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-1/#comment-293 Sat, 31 Jan 2009 11:12:40 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-293 I’m continually astounded at how many discussions about journalism and Twitter — including this one — end up being asking whether Twitter “is” journalism. Of course it isn’t — no more than the telephone system is journalism or a typewriter is journalism.

Even if you take the word “Twitter” as shorthand for “the communities of people who use Twitter” rather than the technology itself, it’s still not journalism — any more than the groups of people talking at a bar or on a street corner are journalism.

Journalism is a process by which all these raw sources of information is turned into some sort of media product — a newspaper story, a TV report or whatever. Those processes include uncovering hidden truths, cross-checking the information you receive and turning it all into a coherent narrative for your audience.

A 140-character tweet could itself be a journalistic product. But it’s the processes — and the people who conduct those processes — that make that tweet The News rather than small-n news or, as we like to call it, “gossip”.

Someone asked how you fact-check a tweet. Exactly the same as any other piece of information you receive. The medium by which you receive that information makes no difference whatsoever.

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By: John Le Fevre http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2009/01/30/twittering-away-standards-or-tweeting-the-future-of-journalism/comment-page-1/#comment-291 Sat, 31 Jan 2009 03:16:38 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/?p=27#comment-291 Twittering is a great way to generate further interest in a breaking story provided what is being twittered is accurate, unbiased, and unadulterated. Yes it can be journalism, but it can also be abused and be propaganda. Is it dangerous? I could be. Is it embarrassing? Not unless it’s inaccurate or biased.
Journalism has changed a lot int he 20-years that I have practiced the craft. There are still extremely conservative individuals who refuse to move with the times. This was the case when I began my career and is still the case today.
The public – and the media – need to ensure that twittering news items such as this does not get abused. Unfortunately it is my belief that some spin-doctors, PR and marketing types will focus on this and abuse the technology.

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