Funds Hub

Money managers under the microscope

Hedge fund’s wine-stained explorer’s diary tries to make investor letters less boring

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Nicolas Clavel Secretive hedge fund managers have been water-marking their investor letters for years as a way to prevent people from distributing their words of wisdom too broadly. But Nicolas Clavel of the near $100 million London and Geneva-based hedge fund Scipion Capital is taking it to new levels by sharing his wine-stained diary with  investors.

Fed up with the tedium of monthly investor letters, Clavel started adding a little more pizazz to the communications of his African and commodity focused hedge funds this summer by publishing an “African Explorer’s Diary.”

Morning Line-up: Money flowing back to funds

RTR1SGF8News and views on the asset management industry from Reuters and elsewhere

Henderson merges five equity funds – Reuters

Liontrust revival continues – Reuters

UK savers flock to funds - PA

EU short selling rules could reduce market liquidity – Financial Times

from Global Investing:

Inside the Reuters investment polls

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The headline news from our Reuters asset allocation polls this month was that not much has changed from December in terms of overall investment positioning, but that there was a decided shift from emerging markets and European stocks to North America.

But buried in the numbers were a couple of other things:

-- Bonds are decidedly unpopular among fund managers. The overall global allocation was the lowest since February.

The Naked Truth

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By Ed Moisson, Head of UK & Cross-Border Research at Lipper

Do independent asset managers perform better than bank-run funds?

Lipper was recently approached to analyse the difference in performance between funds operated by broader financial services companies (banks and insurers) and those managed by ‘pure play’ asset managers.

This research came in the wake of comments made by Peter Hargreaves, founder of IFA Hargreaves Lansdown, who said in September that many funds in the UK run by banks were “seriously crap”.

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