Funds Hub

Money managers under the microscope

from Global Investing:

Winners, losers and the decline of fear

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Lipper has released its monthly look at fund flow trends in Europe, and as ever, it throws up some intriguing results.

August saw bond funds again dominate inflows, pulling in a net 20.8 billion euros and just a tad down on July's record. Stocks funds continued to suffer, as British equity products led the laggards with close to 2 billion euros withdrawn by clients over the month. North American equity funds and their German counterparts also saw big outflows.

Looking regionally, the Italian fund sector continues to show some surprising strength. Net funds sales there topped the table for the second month running. You can see Lipper's heat map of sales and AuM below:

Now I plainly lack the analytical acumen of the Lipper experts like Ed Moisson, but inspired by their efforts I've been running some numbers for fund flows over the year to date, trying to dig a little deeper than the headline figures. There's no detailed data yet available for September so forgive me for looking back at the eight months to end August, where there is something of a confirmation that investors are losing some of their timidity.

from Global Investing:

Funds will find a chill Wind in the Willows: Lipper

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"Asset managers are emerging from their comfortable burrow to face a battery of lights."

Sheila Nicoll, Director of Conduct Policy at Britain's Financial Services Authority (FSA), had perhaps been reading Kenneth Grahame before her recent speech, and her words are likely to have sent a chilly wind through the willows of the UK funds industry.

from Global Investing:

Making the most of the shareholder spring

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We've had a fair while to ponder the implications of a British AGM season which saw investors oust a few CEOs and deal bloody noses to a few others. We've also had some data which implies the revolt wasn't as widespread as advertised, but Sacha Sadan at Legal and General Investment Management thinks we have seen something important, and something that must be exploited.

His take is that austerity is at the heart of the matter. While the public suffers in a faltering economy, and investors stomach dwindling returns, it was never going to fly that pay deals for bosses should survive unchallenged. Add to that government and media pressure on remuneration, plus a new era of investor collaboration thanks to the stewardship code, and you get an ideal set of factors to drive the 'shareholder spring'.

from Global Investing:

No BRIC without China

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Jim O' Neill, creator of the BRIC investment concept, has been exasperated by repeated calls in the past to exclude one or another country from the quartet, based on either economic growth rates, equity performance or market structure. In the early years, Brazil's eligibility for BRIC was often questioned due to its anaemic growth; then it was the turn of oil-dependent Russia. Over the past couple of years many turned their sights on India due to its reform stupor. They have suggested removing it and including Indonesia in its place.

All these detractors should focus on China.

China's validity in BRIC has never been questioned. Aside from the fact that BRI does not really have a ring, that's not surprising. China's growth rates plus undoubted political and economic clout on the international stage put  it head and shoulders above the other three. And after all, it is Chinese demand which drives a large part of the Russian and Brazilian economies.

from Global Investing:

Pay votes update… Spring takes a fall?

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A few months ago, at the height of the British AGM season, we ran some numbers on shareholder protest votes over executive pay.

It seemed striking at the time that despite all the talk of revolution, the average vote against FTSE 100 companies' remuneration reports had only edged higher, to 8.2% from 8.0% in 2011.

from Global Investing:

Emerging corporate debt tips the scales

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Time was when investing in emerging markets meant buying dollar bonds issued by developing countries' governments.

How old fashioned. These days it's more about emerging corporate bonds, if the emerging market gurus at JP Morgan are to be believed. According to them, the stock of debt from emerging market companies now exceeds that of dollar bonds issued by emerging governments for the first time ever.

from Global Investing:

Emerging corporate debt tips the scales

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Time was when investing in emerging markets meant buying dollar bonds issued by developing countries' governments.

How old fashioned. These days it's more about emerging corporate bonds, if the emerging market gurus at JP Morgan are to be believed. According to them, the stock of debt from emerging market companies now exceeds that of dollar bonds issued by emerging governments for the first time ever.

from Global Investing:

LIPPER-ETF tiddlers for the chop?

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(The author is Head of EMEA Research at Thomson Reuters fund research firm Lipper. The views expressed are his own.)

By Detlef Glow

The exchange-traded fund (ETF) market has shown strong growth since its inception in Europe. Many fund promoters have sought to capitalise on this, seeking to differentiate themselves from rivals and match client needs by injecting some innovation into their product offerings. This has led to a broad variety of ETFs competing for assets, both in terms of asset classes and replication techniques.

from Global Investing:

GUEST BLOG: The missing reform in the Kay Review

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Simon Wong is partner at investment firm Governance for Owners, adjunct professor of law at Northwestern University School of Law, and visiting fellow at the London School of Economics. He can be found on Twitter at @SimonCYWong. The opinions expressed reflect his personal views only.

There is much to commend in the Kay Review final report. It contains a rigorous analysis of the causes of short-termism in the UK equity markets and wide-ranging, thoughtful recommendations on the way forward.  Yet, it is surprising that John Kay omitted one crucial reform that would materially affect of the achievability of several of his key recommendations – shortening the chain of intermediaries, eliminating the use of short-term performance metrics for asset managers, and adopting more concentrated portfolios.  What’s missing?  Reconfiguring the structure and governance of pension funds.

from Global Investing:

Yield-hungry funds lend $2bln to Ukraine

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Investors just cannot get enough of emerging market bonds. Ukraine, possibly one of the weakest of the big economies in the developing world, this week returned to global capital markets for the first time in a year , selling $2 billion in 5-year dollar bonds.  Investors placed orders for seven times that amount, lured doubtless by the 9.25 percent yield on offer.

Ukraine's problems are well known, with fears even that the country could default on debt this year.  The $2 billion will therefore come as a relief. But the dangers are not over yet, which might make its success on bond markets look all the more surprising.

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