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Money managers under the microscope

from Global Investing:

Lipper: Getting serious about giving

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"Wouldn't you rather your donations achieve a lot rather than a little? Then you'll need to get serious and proactive. If you do it wrong, you can easily waste your entire donation."

Caroline Fiennes is not one to pull her punches when talking about charitable giving, but the more I talk to her, or read her new book - 'It Ain't What You Give It's The Way That You Give It' - the more it becomes apparent that her philosophy is not all that different from that of a professional fund manager.

No self-respecting fund manager would invest in a company just because they were asked to. A fund manager will choose to invest (or disinvest) because they believe it will help their fund perform well and that the investment fits within their investment objectives. Fiennes, who advises companies and individuals on their giving, advocates a similar approach for any donor: be clear about your objective and find organisations that have done a good job of achieving this, not just the ones that market themselves well.

This is just the start. As James Caan, entrepreneur and philanthropist, puts it, "Finding, investing and supporting good businesses is hard, but identifying, donating and supporting great charities poses the same challenges." This is all the more apt as Caan has also been the chairman of a fund manager, Insynergy Investment Management.

LIPPER: Equine vs equity investing

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Is betting on horses very different from picking stocks? Can understanding a gambler’s approach and mentality give a better understanding of fund managers?

In searching for answers to these questions, I spoke to Paul Moulton, a professional gambler who originally worked in the fund management industry. He then set up a fund research company (Fitzrovia International, which he eventually sold to Reuters), although his working life began with an attempt to become a professional chess player.

Rude health, and a changing of the guard?

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By Detlef Glow, Head of EMEA Research at Lipper. The views expressed are his own.

The European exchange-traded-fund (ETF) industry has shown some resilience in the face of questions about management practices raised by market observers like the Financial Stability Board (FSB) and regulatory bodies like the FSA in the UK.

Risk Management: Did fund managers learn their lesson?

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By Detlef Glow, Head of EMEA Research at Lipper. The views expressed are his own.

In the last decade investors and fund managers faced two major crises in the stock markets, the popping of the technology bubble in 2001 and financial crisis starting in 2006.

A choice between risk and return?

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By Dunny P. Moonesawmy. Head of Fund Research for Lipper in Western Europe/Middle East and Africa. The views expressed are his own.

Hedge funds have delivered decent risk-return results over the past ten years. And as transparency and liquidity increased post-credit crisis, they have regained their appeal as providers of absolute return opportunities for investors. In addition, an increasing lack of market visibility globally has played to hedge funds’ supposed strengths, with total industry assets under management now exceeding the $2 trillion, according to Hedge Fund Research.

KIIDs can help bridge the trust gap: Lipper

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By Merieme Boutayeb. Research Analyst at Lipper. The views expressed are her own.

The European fund industry is getting a second chance this week to improve the way it communicates with investors when selling its products. While the first effort became mired in legalese and complexity, the Key Investor Information Document, or KIID, should offer a golden opportunity to recoup some more of the trust lost during and after the financial crisis. Firms would do well to look past their misgivings and not waste it.

Are marathon runners trying to sprint?

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“The long is short. Investment choice, like other life choices, is being re-tuned to a shorter wave-length.” So stated Andy Haldane of the Bank of England in a speech last month.

If one of the key features of a mutual fund is that it is a long-term investment, then concerns that money is being managed over decreasing time horizons should be treated seriously.

Risk revolution

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By Dunny P. Moonesawmy, Head of Fund Research for Lipper in western Europe, Middle East and Africa. The views expressed are his own. LONDON, April 6 (Reuters) – The evaluation of an investment is measured by its potential performance and risk, and historically, investors have given more importance to the former than the latter. Recent events in the market, however, have challenged the hierarchy, placing risk at the heart of investors’ thinking. It is little short of a revolution in the investment industry. While performance is associated with opportunities, risk is linked with danger and the switch in thinking is prompting investors to take a more defensive approach. There have been several factors behind that change. The market is more volatile and given to quicker and more abrupt downturns; there is a polarization of economic growth outside core western economies; demographic change has led to the growing importance of liability management; and regulatory constraints have put extra pressure on institutional players to limit risky investments. Up to 1996, we enjoyed smooth growth trends in markets, with steady periods of drawdown and recovery. Over the past 15 years, however, the nature of market cycles has changed. Periods of exponential growth have been followed by deep crises, creating opportunities for hedge-fund style managers but a nightmare for long-only managers trying to protect assets. Both institutional and retail investors have had a hard time during these two crises with significant consequences on their risk appetite. For a chart detailing the recent trends, click: http://r.reuters.com/gef88r Data from Lipper shows 10.18 percent average annual growth of the MSCI World TR in dollar terms between 1970 and 1980, 16.3 percent the following decade and 15.92 percent in the 1990s. The figure stood at only 1.77 percent during the last decade due to the two major downturns — the bursting of the internet bubble and the credit crisis. When we look closely how performance was distributed for the past 15 years, we have a cumulative performance of 101.86 percent over the four years to end-1999, followed by a short but severe downturn of -50.74% from 2000 to 2002. From 2003 to 2006, the market rose a cumulative 52.93 percent in 4 years and then dived 37.24 percent in 2008 to emerge again with cumulative growth of 46.9 percent in 2009 and 2010. POLARIZED GROWTH Investors cannot time the market, much as they might try. Strong downturns are prejudicial for portfolios and over the past couple of years, the risk management component has been given a far higher rating in the evaluation of managers before investment mandates are attributed. Investors are also concerned about the polarization of growth in emerging countries. Although there are now many brokers offering their services in the region and information is more fluid, investors remain cautious due to the risks — geopolitical, transparency and geographical — associated in investing in emerging countries. They therefore tend to modify their allocations to give more accent to tactical allocation than to strategic, long-term investment. Indeed, while investors poured $25 billion into emerging market equity funds in 2010, they have removed nearly $2 billion in the first two months of this year. Another consequence of the aftermath of the credit crisis is an acknowledgement of the inadequacy of investment yields in light of the liabilities faced by insurers and pension schemes as longevity increases. Asset Liability Management (ALM) is forcing managers to look for alternative ways of increasing yields without taking too much risk. As a consequence of the credit crisis, asset allocation has been largely reshuffled away from equities as investors scrambled to get a handle on their investment risk. Alternative investment managers running hedge funds or hedge-fund style absolute return funds have been solicited by pension schemes but trustees are conscious that between ex-ante volatility promises and ex-post crisis volatility there is a big difference. As such, annualized standard deviation for hedge funds from 2004 to 2006 stood at 11.76 percent but this figure almost doubled to 22.77 percent in 2008. Regulatory measures contained in Basel III and Solvency II will also limit bank and insurers exposures to equities and create a framework where risk is at the centre of investment decisions, helping to foster a top-down approach for risk management. Institutional players and individual investors alike are putting a premium on protecting assets as well as growing them and are eyeing the market with suspicion. The shift is ubiquitous. And successful fund managers will be those who accept risk criteria are emerging ahead of future returns in post-credit crisis portfolio management. (Editing by Joel Dimmock) ((dunny.moonesawmy1@thomsonreuters.com; +33 1 4949 5009))

By Dunny P. Moonesawmy, Head of Fund Research for Lipper in western Europe, Middle East and Africa. The views expressed are his own.

The evaluation of an investment is measured by its potential performance and risk, and historically, investors have given more importance to the former than the latter. Recent events in the market, however, have challenged the hierarchy, placing risk at the heart of investors’ thinking. It is little short of a revolution in the investment industry.

Shocking.. Toxic.. Nasties.. Devastating.. Leeches..

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.. Some select phrases from this morning’s Daily Mail pop at greedy fund managers who rake in fees whether or not they’re beating the market. It might read a bit like an advertiorial for passive managers like Vanguard (which gets an unusually high number of prominent name checks) but it won’t be comfortable reading for other asset management execs.

The paper’s salvo gives a kicking to firms like Axa and Henderson and makes much of the secretive pay packages earned by the fundies and the marketeers. It also, somewhat bizarrely reckons the grey-suited long-only managers looking after your ISA are responsible for most of the yachts bobbing gently in the Marina at Monte Carlo.

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