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from Global Investing:

EM growth is passport out of West’s mess but has a price, says “Mr BRIC”

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Anyone worried about Greece and the potential impact of the euro debt crisis on the world economy should have a chat with Jim O'Neill. O'Neill, the head of Goldman Sachs Asset Management ten years ago coined the BRIC acronym to describe the four biggest emerging economies and perhaps understandably, he is not too perturbed by the outcome of the Greek crisis. Speaking at a recent conference, the man who is often called Mr BRIC, pointed out that China's economy is growing by $1 trillion a year  and that means it is adding the equivalent of a Greece every 4 months. And what if the market turns its guns on Italy, a far larger economy than Greece?  Italy's economy was surpassed in size last year by Brazil, another of the BRICs, O'Neill counters, adding:

"How Italy plays out will be important but people should not exaggerate its global importance.  In the next 12 months the four BRICs will create the equivalent of another Italy."

Emerging economies are cooling now after years of turbo-charged growth. But according to O'Neill, even then they are growing enough to allow the global economy to expand at 4-4.5 percent,  a faster clip than much of the past 30 years. Trade data for last year will soon show that Germany for the first time exported more goods to the four BRICs than to neighbouring France, he said.

"Post-crisis, these countries will be our passport out of this mess."

But there has to be a payoff for this kind of increased financial clout, he warns. Developing countries are increasingly disgruntled about the the richer world's strangehold on global policies via the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank and most have responded coolly to the call for additional funds for the IMF which is fighting to stem the euro zone malaise. An attempt last year to install a representative of the developing world at the helm of the IMF for the first time ever fell apart, with Europe retaining the position. But emerging countries could make a bid for the World Bank chief's position this year, a position traditionally held by a U.S. citizen. O'Neill said the West had to bow to the new reality:

Paulson’s Goldman defense

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As stock bets go it is no way the biggest and not particularly dramatic.

But the decision by Paulson & Co. to pick-up some 1 million shares of Goldman Sachs Group in the second-quarter may be some of the most fitting piece of Wall Street poetry to come out of this latest round of 13-F filings.

Of course Paulson’s fund will forever be linked with Goldman because it was the hedge fund at the heart of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s civil fraud case against the Wall Street bank. The SEC, in April, charged Goldman with failing to disclose that Paulson’s hedge fund had a hand in picking securities for a complex mortgage-related deal that the hedge fund was betting against.

from MediaFile:

Anyway you look at it, it’s still “shitty”

"Shitty" is such an under-used word on TV and in the stately halls of Capitol Hill, except today as senators – especially Carl Levin --  grilled Goldman Sachs executives on their role in the sub-prime mortgage meltdown. "Shitty" and its second cousin "crappy" are flying all over the place thanks to an e-mail in which Goldman Sachs employees used the phrase “shitty deal.”

This presented a dilemma for news organizations, many of which have been live blogging the hearing. Let’s check in and see how shitty goes down in the various style guides.  (It  goes without saying, shitty is acceptable over here.)

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