Funds Hub

Money managers under the microscope

from Global Investing:

Certain danger: Extreme investing in Africa

The Arab Spring, for all its democratic and political virtues,  put a big economic dent in the side of participating North African countries, particularly when it came to attracting foreign investment in 2011.

According to a recent UNCTAD report:

Sub-Saharan Africa drew FDI not only to its natural resources, but also to its emerging consumer markets as the growth outlook remained positive. Political uncertainty in North Africa deterred investment in that region.

So far, so logical. Except that simply can't be all there is to it.

Why? Because plenty of African countries marred by political uncertainty have succeeded in attracting inward FDI.

The Democratic Republic of Congo is a good example. According to political risk consultancy Maplecroft, the country ranks as "extreme" in its risk index for governance framework, regulatory and business environment, conflict and security and human rights and society. It scores 0.00 on business integrity and corruption. And yet in 2011 it attacted over a billion dollars in FDI, according to the UNCTAD report.

from Global Investing:

Investors hungover after wine binge

During this depression, it would appear that investors are no longer finding solace in turning to the bottle.

Fine wines are being hit hard by the global downturn, with the Liv-ex Fine Wine 100 index down 7.4 percent on the year, according to July’s Cellar Watch Market Report.

from Global Investing:

Lipper: Getting serious about giving

"Wouldn't you rather your donations achieve a lot rather than a little? Then you'll need to get serious and proactive. If you do it wrong, you can easily waste your entire donation."

Caroline Fiennes is not one to pull her punches when talking about charitable giving, but the more I talk to her, or read her new book - 'It Ain't What You Give It's The Way That You Give It' - the more it becomes apparent that her philosophy is not all that different from that of a professional fund manager.

from Global Investing:

The ETF ‘Death List’

Our colleagues at Lipper have put together some eye-catching data on developments in the ETF industry. You can read the slides here.

Most intriguing is the idea of a slumbering cohort of 241 exchange-traded funds forming what Lipper calls a 'Death List'; ETFs which are more than three years old, but which have failed to drive assets up to the 100 million euro-mark.

10 years of fund industry evolution: Lipper

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“A game of two halves” is a footballing cliché in the UK, but was particularly apt for the European funds industry in 2011. The stock market falls that began in July not only ended the healthy sales activity that had started the year, but triggered a wave of redemptions that rolled through the industry. While these outflows ebbed slightly in the final quarter of the year, there were few who did not feel the cold chill of investors withdrawing from mutual funds by the year-end.

Net sales of long-term funds (i.e. excluding money market funds) in 2010 (305.8 billion euros) exceeded not just those of 2009 (257.7 billion), but also the level achieved in pre-crisis 2006 (265.9 billion). Expectations were therefore high when the first half of 2011 saw inflows of 96.1 billion euros, but this was followed by outflows of 155.9 billion, so that the year as a whole ended in the red (-59.8 billion) for only the second time in a decade (the 2008 total was -391.4 billion euros).

How much do UK investors care about costs?

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- As the debate on fund charges heats up, the appeal of having a barometer to gauge investors’ attitudes to fund costs has risen. Ideally this would go beyond opinion polls and show not just what investors think, but what they actually do.

One way of measuring this is to look at the assets invested in index tracking funds (where minimising costs is a core part of the product) and compare this to funds of funds (where the importance of professional fund manager selection entails an additional cost).

With 30.5 billion pounds invested in the former and 56.6 billion pounds in the latter as of November 30 2011, it would seem that retail investors in the UK are almost twice as likely to pay more for active management and fund selection than to minimise costs and seek to mimic the returns of an index. A similar picture is revealed for sales activity in 2011.

from Jeremy Gaunt:

Getting there from here

Depending on how you look at it, August may not have been as bad a month for stocks as advertised. For the month as a whole, the MSCI all-country world stock index  lost more than 7.5 percent.  This was the worst performance since May last year, and the worst August since 1998.

But if you had bought in at the low on August 9, you would have gained  healthy 8.5 percent or so.

from Jeremy Gaunt:

Don’t invest in gold?

Bit of fun, this -- and might raise some issues about returning to the Gold Standard. The S&P 500 stock index priced in gold (thanks to Reuters graphics whiz Scott Barber):

Equities - SP 500 priced in dollars and gold

Jim Saft: Monkey business

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- By Jim Saft HUNTSVILLE, Ala., March 10 (Reuters) – Patience, particularly in investing, is one of those virtues everyone praises but for which no one seems willing to pay. An investment manager given money to manage is going to do the same thing with it pretty much every time: put the money to work. This is true almost always and almost without reference to how attractive the alternatives are. Partly this is because the fund manager reasons that you would not have given him money if you wanted him to keep it sitting idle in a liquidity account, but also because most fund managers spend most of their time managing a specific kind of risk: career risk. Even if they may be personally convinced that the markets they follow do not represent good value, the decision to stay in cash is personally risky for them. People don’t get fired for trailing the index by a point or two, but they do often if they miss a big rally. That leaves most money managers with a perverse incentive; look like everyone else, take a few small bets away from the index you track and live to pay off your mortgage and fully fund your kids’ educations. It is also, I would argue, psychologically hard for primates like us to refrain from activity; big cats do well out of waiting for their moment but monkeys usually make a living through ceaseless activity. “Patience is also required when investors are faced with an unappealing opportunity set,” James Montier of fund manager GMO writes in a letter to clients that argues that no major asset class currently offers fair value, much less a margin of safety. See www.GMO.com “Many investors seem to suffer from an “action bias” — a desire to do something. However, when there is nothing to do, the best plan is usually to do nothing. Stand at the plate and wait for the fat pitch.” The baseball metaphor is apt; nothing gets less respect, historically, from the people who decide who gets to play baseball for a living than the walk. Batters who are willing to take pitches used to actually be thought of as lazy, even though recent statistical evidence indicates that the ability to get on base is highly correlated, amazingly enough, with scoring runs. So it is with investors; deciding not to act, not to participate when value is not there is both freeing and likely to lead to better returns over the long haul. That said, there is absolutely no doubt that sitting out overvalued markets is a career killer for investment professionals and the kind of tactic best discussed with one’s spouse well in advance. BILL GROSS’ BIG BET This brings us to the astounding bet currently being made by bond king Bill Gross and PIMCO, whose flagship Total Return Fund, the world’s biggest bond fund, has dumped all U.S. government-related securities, including Treasuries and agency debt. Gross took cash to 23 percent of the fund, up from just 5 percent a month ago. In the Unconstrained Bond Fund, which is given more latitude, cash is an unbelievable 92 percent. In part perhaps this reflects that Gross — rich, a brand unto himself and well along in years — is past the point of managing career risk. It also, though, reflects the extraordinary state of markets today. Quantitative easing has effectively rigged the markets by buying up huge amounts of Treasuries. This has prompted a rally in riskier assets and raised legitimate questions over who will be there to buy U.S. government debt when the QE program comes to an end on June 30. Gross argues that this will come as a shock to risk markets and Treasuries alike. If it does and PIMCO keeps its portfolio looking like it does now, Gross will have quite a fat pitch to hit with his bundle of cash. If not, well then … It all puts me in mind of Tony Dye, a legendary British fund manager who earned the nickname “Dr Doom” with his  correct analysis of the stock market bubble that popped in 2000. Dye, who was the dominant manager in a highly concentrated pension fund industry, was so convinced of the bubble that at one point he took his main fund to a zero weighting in U.S. stocks. Hilariously, Dye’s funds were so large that they distorted the index used to judge fund manager performance and many of his less convinced peers duly turned bearish too, managing their own careers. Dye, I hate to tell you, was bearish right until he was forced into early retirement in March of 2000, less than a month from the top of the market. (Editing by James Dalgleish) (At the time of publication James Saft did not own any direct investments in securities mentioned in this article. He may be an owner indirectly as an investor in a fund. For previous columns by James Saft, click on [SAFT/]) ((jamessaft@jamessaft.com; Tel: +1-256 715 1303)) Keywords: COLUMN MARKETS/SAFT

By Jim Saft

HUNTSVILLE, Ala., March 10 (Reuters) – Patience, particularly in investing, is one of those virtues everyone praises but for which no one seems willing to pay.

from Reuters Investigates:

Morbid money-spinners

If the life settlements market seems ghoulish, here’s a British scandal which isn’t doing the image of the business any favours. It’s one of the worst the country’s seen.

Around 30,000 mainly elderly investors in the UK put their money into a company called Keydata, hoping to make a little extra cash to fund their own retirement with the promise of a healthy return.

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