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Money managers under the microscope

from Global Investing:

And the winner is — frontier market bonds

Global Investing has commented before on how strongly the world's riskiest bonds -- from the so-called frontier markets such as Mongolia, Nigeria and Guatemala -- have performed.  NEXGEM, the frontier component of the bond index family run by JP Morgan, is on track to outperform all other fixed income classes this year with returns of over 20 percent., the bank tells clients in a note today. Just to compare, broader emerging dollar bonds on the EMBI Global index have returned some 16 percent year-to-date while local currency emerging debt is up 13 percent.

That appetite for the sector is strong was proven by a September Eurobond from Zambia that was 15 times subscribed. Demand shows no sign of flagging despite a default in frontier peer Belize and shenanigans over the payment of Ivory Coast's missed coupons from last year. Reasons are easy to find. First, the yield. The average yield on the NEXGEM is roughly 6.5 percent compared with  just under 5 percent on the EMBIG.

Second, this is where a lot of issuance is happening as big emerging markets such as Brazil and Mexico, once prolific dollar bond issuers, sell less and less on external markets in favour of domestic debt.  Frontier markets are filling the gap. JPM says Angola, Guatemala, Mongolia and Zambia joined the NEXGEM in 2012 as they made their debut on global capital markets. Bolivia is also set for inclusion soon, taking the number of NEXGEM members to 23 by end-2012.

 

NEXGEM's market value also jumped in this period by 36 percent to $33.3 billion. It now represents 5.9 percent of the EMBI Global, up from 5.3 percent a year back, JP says.

from Global Investing:

Emerging corporate debt tips the scales

Time was when investing in emerging markets meant buying dollar bonds issued by developing countries' governments.

How old fashioned. These days it's more about emerging corporate bonds, if the emerging market gurus at JP Morgan are to be believed. According to them, the stock of debt from emerging market companies now exceeds that of dollar bonds issued by emerging governments for the first time ever.

from Global Investing:

Emerging corporate debt tips the scales

Time was when investing in emerging markets meant buying dollar bonds issued by developing countries' governments.

How old fashioned. These days it's more about emerging corporate bonds, if the emerging market gurus at JP Morgan are to be believed. According to them, the stock of debt from emerging market companies now exceeds that of dollar bonds issued by emerging governments for the first time ever.

from DealZone:

In man vs machine, GLG has Manly appeal

Hedge fund firm Man Group apparently pricey deal to buy GLG Partners gives Man – the world’s biggest listed hedge fund -- better access to the large and lucrative U.S. market. It also counts as a small win for the human race in its apocryphal war for investors' funds with cheaper, faster and -- many would argue -- far more dangerous algorithmic trading machines known as black boxes.

The $1.6 billion cash-and-shares deal represents a heady 55 percent premium to GLG's closing price on Friday. Clearly some investors are worried it's a little too rich. It has so far driven the shares of Man – which had already lost about a fifth of their value since mid-April -- down by a little more than 8 percent.

Out for the count

Photo

A bit delayed this, but drawing your attention to Parvathy Ullatil’s entertaining look at hedge fund managers going at each other with fists and gumshields, rather than outlandish claims of stratospheric bonuses. Photos from Reuters pictures.

Steve 'Dynamite' Davidson from JP Morgan is introduced before a boxing match during the Hedge Fund Fight Nite in Hong Kong October 29, 2009. Twelve financiers participated in six charity fights on Thursday, watched by 800 of their peers from the corporate and finance world of Hong Kong. REUTERS/Bobby Yip (CHINA)It was the kind of opportunity loss-stricken investors probably wished for in the worst months of the financial crisis: getting a bunch of hedge fund managers in a boxing ring and pummeling them. 

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