Gary's Feed
Dec 16, 2013
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Fly fishing with veterans

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Hopeville Canyon, West Virginia

By Gary Cameron

In the summer of 2012, I photographed the Wounded Warriors Amputee Softball team as they played against local teams in central New York. Veterans of the Afghanistan, Persian Gulf and Iraq wars, their horrific wounds were quite evident; everyone on the team had a minimum of one limb missing, if not more. If there was one common factor that I learned from that story, it was that veterans, no matter what their military affiliation or tour of service, have a quiet understanding among themselves that bonds them with the awful experience of war. These men and women, attempting to continue on with their lives and families once home again, have seen too much conflict. At a very young age, they have had too many tours, too many nightmares, and too many difficulties in re-adjusting back from a world where things blow up on a daily basis and friends are seriously injured or killed.

Project Healing Waters is a program that began in 2005 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington for veterans who had served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Its purpose was to provide veterans with access to the many aspects in the art of fly fishing, and the serenity that accompanies this art.

Nov 28, 2013
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Reflecting on Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address

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Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

By Gary Cameron

He arrived on the evening train from Washington, accompanied by two secretaries, three members of his Cabinet, and several foreign officials. During the train trip, he commented that he felt weak and dizzy. During the speech, it was noted that he face had ‘a ghastly color.’ After the speech, he boarded a train back to the nation’s capital and was feverish and had a bad headache. An extended illness continued, and the President appeared to be in the throes of smallpox when he delivered the Gettysburg Address at the Gettysburg National Cemetery dedication.

Throw in the fact that Abraham Lincoln, in November of 1863, was attempting to save and re-unite a nation in the middle of a Civil War, free a people who came to the U.S. shores in chains and committed to a life of servitude and bondage, dealing with the loss of his young son Willie in 1862, (of the three Lincoln children, only one survived in adulthood), and married to a woman who possessed incredible mood swings, a fierce temper, and depression.

Jul 11, 2013
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On the gruesome battlefield of Gettysburg

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Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

By Gary Cameron

The 150th anniversary and reenactment of the U.S. Civil War battle in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania was a story suggested months ago by Reuters Pictures Editor Mike Fiala. Lasting three days, it would include thousands of re-enactors dressed in blue & gray wool uniforms who would live in historically accurate camps with canvas tents, and include 400 horses for cavalry units, with over 200 cannons from both sides to effectively blast each other off the battlefield. Add thousands of rifles and side arms to the mix (all weaponry fires black powder but no shells or bullets in re-enactments), and you have the makings of one very loud display of history, carnage and destruction.

What I did not know is that NO re-enactment battles of Gettysburg would be played out on the actual “hallowed” ground of the 1863 conflict. Two separate re-enactment groups would have their own events, each with versions of the July 1, 2, and 3 battle days, on large nearby farms. Stadium seating similar to those used at professional golf tournaments would accommodate 10,000 fans and border the battlefields.

May 30, 2013
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Behind the snakehead legend

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Mt. Vernon, Virginia

By Gary Cameron

Spending time on the water pursuing fish is one of my favorite, relaxing pastimes. Spending time on the water pursuing fish as part of my job comes in as a close second.

In a city that requires plenty of time having photographers covering men in suits behind microphones with lots of blah-blah-blah, going out on a Virginia Department of Game and Inland fisheries biologists “stunboat” for a day of chasing, capturing, monitoring, studying, dissecting and releasing the once-feared northern snakehead fish was an assignment I looked forward to.

Nov 8, 2012
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Feeling the names of the fallen

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Washington, D.C.

By Gary Cameron

There’s an old military adage, which seems to follow more fact than fiction, that if you arrive 15 minutes BEFORE your scheduled starting time, you are late.

Given that, I found myself attempting to find the walkway to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington 30 minutes before the volunteers from the Vietnam Veterans of America local chapter 641 arrived at 06:00 for a weekly cleaning of the black granite and grounds.

Jul 5, 2012
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“Bring the generator, and a chainsaw”

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By Gary Cameron

Finishing the last day of a nice Canadian fishing vacation, (in 70 degree temperatures with no humidity I might add), I got “the call” from my wife Joann last Saturday. She had just returned to our Silver Spring, Maryland home of 29 years.

“Bring the generator, and a chainsaw.” Oh, oh, sounded like vacation time was over.

May 29, 2012
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Taking the field with wounded warriors

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By Gary Cameron

The night before I was to head to central New York state to cover the Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team for a Memorial Day weekend story, I played a double-header on my own softball team.

As I slid into third base, the opponent’s third baseman’s knee, and my rib cage, met with enough force to make us both wince and hit the ground hard.

May 28, 2012

Wounded U.S. war veterans find brotherhood in softball

, May 28 (Reuters) – When Saul Bosquez, a
27-year-old U.S. Army veteran who lost part of his left leg in
Iraq, stepped up to the plate during a softball game this
Memorial Day weekend, he knew he needed a big hit.

Bosquez, who plays with the Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball
Team and wears a prosthetic leg below his left knee, said the
hot weather on Sunday in Cooperstown – home to the Baseball Hall
of Fame – was making it harder than usual for him to run the
bases.

Apr 18, 2012
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Shuttle dream discovery

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By Gary Cameron

While every photographer for Reuters is expected to cover, and have a knowledge on an array of events, whether they be political, sports, entertainment, or features, there are certain subjects that always hold a personal interest. For me, if it has wheels, wings, and a sense of history, I want to be there.

The arrival of the space shuttle Discovery from Cape Canaveral, Florida to Dulles International Airport in Virginia (where it will be transferred into the Smithsonian Air and Space collection) yesterday took some minor planning locally, mainly with trying to figure out where our best photo positions would be around Washington, D.C. as Discovery did a last fly-over before landing at Dulles.

Jan 19, 2012
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The Kodak tragedy

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By Gary Cameron

Like so many consumers who have seen the continual demise of Eastman Kodak and it’s many film, and film-related products, I view today’s filing for Chapter 11 protection with incredible sadness. That sadness is coupled, however, with the cruel understanding of how a great U.S. company that once led the world in its respective industry, is poised now to go the same route as Oldsmobile, Plymouth, Pontiac, and join an ever-growing group of American industrial icons that did not keep up or improve their product enough to stay competitive.

As a news photographer of 32 years, a lot of Kodak film and chemistry has passed through my hands. Having the last name of Cameron played a part. Schoolyard taunts of “Gary Camera, Gary Camera,” never angered me. Taking pictures was a cool thing to do.