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Who’s elderly?

Obama tells elderly he will protect retirement

obama-300-0908.jpgNEWARK, New Jersey – Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama warned the elderly on Saturday that Republican rival John McCain would put their retirement income in danger.

As an AARP member, I resent being referred to as “elderly.” AARP represents people 50 years of age and older. To infer that our group only consists of the elderly is both misleading and innacurate. I hope you correct this misinformation.

Alan G.

We probably could have come up with a more appropriate word: GBU Editor

REUTERS photo by Allen Fredrickson

Comments

A link to the original article would be nice (as always).

Posted by Dovid | Report as abusive
 

Oh get over yourself. Jeez.

Posted by Whitecup | Report as abusive
 

Just because someone does not like being called elderly does not make them less so. We have to get away from being offended about words and start thinking about substance. Remember 50 is old to someone.

 

Alan G; after 50 you just as well get used to being called elderly I am 80 and I can tell you my friend after 50 get used to it.

Posted by Perry G Rager | Report as abusive
 

Who cares if you’re called elderly.

I call it experienced. The youth of today are clueless. Don’t trust anyone under 30 should be our mantra. The ones 30 – 40, still on a huge learning curve, the ones 40 – 50, getting smarter, those over 50 are seasoned in all the right ways.

Big babies, don’t go running home to mom & dad or granny & grandad when you can’t pay your immense mortgages after your layoffs. Send the grandbabies tho, we want to keep them safe.

Posted by mikemcc | Report as abusive
 

In Webster’s dictionary “elderly” means someone old, or in old age. Once upon a time, so far back I cannot even count, people used to die in their mid- to late-thirties as a matter of course. Now, “hot chicks in their fifties” are almost like like they are in their thirties. Age is so relative – - give me a break. Fifty is a very poor age for delineation into “old age”. What a joke. Off the top of my head, given all the advances of modern medicine, I would call “old” 70. Forget AARP.

 

“Elderly”is fine. Let’s not induce the editor to replace it with “old fools”.

Posted by John Ventrani | Report as abusive
 

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