Good, Bad, and Ugly

Reader reaction to Reuters news

A niggling concern?

August 27, 2009

US housing, confidence data point to recovery

In addition, President Barack Obama nominated Ben Bernanke to a second term as chairman of the Federal Reserve, removing some niggling doubt from investors’ minds. The move promised a consistent approach to monetary policy in the years ahead.

My suggestion based on the story tonight on housing and consumer confidence pointing to recovery. My request is that the editor play a greater role in the reporter’s choice of words. It doesn’t seem to be coincidence anymore of the use of the word “niggling” in the same paragraph as President Obama is mentioned.

It’s gotten old. It’s gotten racist.

Clay

I don’t know where you’re seeing all these references, but it isn’t in our copy. We used the word in three versions of the very same story. Before that, I have to go back for months to find it in a paragraph that also mentions Obama.

If you honestly believe you’re finding objectionable racial references in our stories about the president, then I suspect you’re looking too hard for them. They aren’t there: GBU Editor

U.S. President Barack Obama in Oak Bluffs, Martha’s Vineyard, August 26, 2009. REUTERS/Jason Reed

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Comments

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UUUHHH “Niggling” Concern? hahaha Think were stupid huh ?Good one!!!!

Your showing dude!

Posted by Rave | Report as abusive
 

HAHA Are you saying you totally hands on the bible missed “NIGGLING” when you wrote this article? haha You got a shot of Obama in Nike and everything! You double checked your work? LOL. Ok I will print the article and show it to random people without a word of suggestion from me! Lets see what they say.

Posted by jeff | Report as abusive
 

Jeff, no, I’m not saying we “missed” niggling, I’m saying we used it correctly and there was absolutely no racism intended. People who believe there was are the ones who need to take another look at themselves.

What is missing here is any explanation of why a major global news agency that prides itself in its objectivity would throw in words meant to jab someone’s race or whatever. What’s in it for us?

And Rave, by chance did you mean we’re and you’re?

Posted by Robert Basler | Report as abusive
 

It constantly amazes me how ignorant some people can be. To be unaware of the meaning of the word “niggling” is downright scary. It has nothing to do with race or skin color. Aren’t there enough real problems, without imagining racism where it wasn’t intended or present?

Posted by bookman | Report as abusive
 

Niggling, wiggling, jiggling, giggling, higgling, rigging…. I think we should rid the English language of all words with double GG so as to stop this nonsense of implied racism.

Posted by michael millhollin | Report as abusive
 

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