Pass this word by….

November 10, 2009

Rihanna describes night of attack by Chris Brown

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – R&B singer Rihanna broke her silence on Friday about the night her ex-boyfriend Chris Brown attacked her, saying he had bitten her, put her in a headlock and left her bleeding and swollen.

Her screams prompted a bypasser to call the police.

The little things distinguish good writing from mediocre. In this article, the writer refers to a person assisiting Rihanna as “a bypasser.” I’m guessing that word is not even in the writer’s Spell Check!

It is not a big jump from passer-by to bypasser, I admit, but it makes reading difficult when you stumble on a made up word.

Christopher F.

We should not be in the business of making up words and shouldn’t have used this one: GBU Editor

Singer Rihanna poses for photographers as she arrives at the British premiere of “Inglourious Basterds” at Leicester Square in London July 23, 2009. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor

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One comment

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If there is such a word “bypasser”, it should be in opposite meaning to “passer-by”. How could someone skipping the scene call police ? If indeed these two words are too similar to utter, perhaps we should change their dictionary definitions to mean the same.

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