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Nazis and Dresden…

February 16, 2010

German protesters stop neo-Nazi march in Dresden

GERMANY-NEONAZIS/DRESDEN, Germany (Reuters) – At least 10,000 Germans formed a human chain in Dresden on Saturday and stopped neo-Nazis staging a funeral march to remember victims of the Allied air raid that flattened the city 65 years ago.

About 5,000 neo-Nazis, clad in black, had gathered at Dresden’s Neustadt station — where Nazis once packed trains with Jews bound for the Auschwitz concentration camp — hoping to stage Germany’s biggest far-right march since 1945.

In the past few years, the February 13 anniversary of the destruction of Dresden, in which 25,000 people were killed, has become a focus for neo-Nazis who describe the blanket bombardment as a “bombing Holocaust.”

I want to protest your characterization in this story. Nazis are not far-right politically. The Nazi Party was officially called the National Socialist Democratic Party of Germany. So, I would ask that you have him study history and the concepts of Left and Right when it comes to political thinking. The far-right are no government, anarchists, while the far-left support dictatorships.

Iceman

The internet is why journalists are becoming useless. Over 150,000 died in Dresden not 25,000. It only took me a minute and three clicks on Google to get the facts. i hope you don’t pay your journalist more than minimum wage.

G.W.

We got a surprising amount of e-mail on these two points.

On the matter of the death toll, I’m sure it didn’t take you many clicks to find the 150,000 number, but that doesn’t make it correct. The Nazis made a high toll it a focus of propaganda, and at one point claimed 250,000 dead. A special commission made up of historians reported their findings a couple of years ago. They came up with the 25,000 figure, which appears to be widely accepted.

As for where Nazis fit in the political spectrum, I’m not a huge fan of right/left labels because they are so inconsistent. Having said that, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a serious argument put forth that Nazis belong anywhere other than the extreme right: GBU Editor

German riot police watch right-wing protesters during a demonstration in the streets of Dresden February 13, 2010. At least 10,000 Germans formed a human chain in Dresden on Saturday and stopped neo-Nazis staging a funeral march to remember victims of the Allied air raid that flattened the city 65 years ago. REUTERS/David W Cerny

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Comments

GBU Editor: I agree wholeheartedly.

The 150.000 figure was disproved years ago. G.W should know that Google gives links to all sites, including unreliable ones.

As for Iceman: the Nazi party (NSDAP) was NOT called the National Socialist Democratic Party of Germany, but the National Socialist German Workers’ Party
(Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei).

Posted by x.kreiss | Report as abusive
 

If the police limited the anti-bombing gathering to a rally instead of a march (which appears to be what happened), why is it that some media are reporting that they were “stopped” from marching by the “10,000 Germans” across the river? And why mention Auschwitz? Is Dresden mentioned every time Auschwitz is in the news? Yes, you read right: I’m calling them an “anti-bombing gathering”, since for years the “anti-fascists” have made clear their view of the bombing with toy bomber planes and shouts and signs like “Bomber Harris Do It Again!” As to the total deaths at Dresden: It’s well known the size of the destroyed area. It’s well known the wartime population and influx of refugees into the city just before the time of the attack. Amazing that Haiti’s capital alone is now reported to have lost 150,000 dead -just from building collapses and NOT ONE BOMB DROPPED. Yet, Dresden’s firestorm was no more than 25,000?

Must have been some “precision bombing”, eh? Though you wouldn’t know it to look at photos of Dresden after the attack.

Posted by Alan70 | Report as abusive
 

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