Galileo and the Bible

January 10, 2011

God was behind Big Bang, universe no accident: Pope

ITALY-GALILEO/VATICAN CITY (Reuters) – God’s mind was behind complex scientific theories such as the Big Bang, and Christians should reject the idea that the universe came into being by accident, Pope Benedict said on Thursday.

Benedict and his predecessor John Paul have been trying to shed the Church’s image of being anti-science, a label that stuck when it condemned Galileo for teaching that the earth revolves around the sun, challenging the words of the Bible.

I would like to know where in the Bible it says that the earth does not revolve around the sun. I would love for you to show me because it’s not there.

You are leading many people to believe the Bible says something that it does not. There needs to be a retraction if there is no supporting evidence. For example, if a common belief of the times was that the world was flat does NOT mean that’s what the Bible says.

The Bible does not say that the sun revolves around the earth, and it is a lie to say otherwise.

Holly

Here are a couple of passages sometimes cited in Galileo studies:

The earth and all its inhabitants are dissolved; I set up its pillars firmly: Palms

The sun riseth, and goeth down, and returneth to his place: and there rising again, Ecclesiastes 1:5

And this from the Holy Tribunal in Galileo’s condemnation:

“The proposition that the sun is the center of the world and does not move from its place is absurd and false philosophically and formally heretical, because it is expressly contrary to the Holy Scripture. The proposition that the earth is not the center of the world and immovable, but that it moves, and also with a diurnal motion, is equally absurd and false philosophically, and theologically considered, at least erroneous in faith.”

GBU Editor

The 1635 portrait of astronomer Galileo Galilei by Dutch painter Justus Sustermans hangs in the Palazzo Pitti art gallery in Florence January 22, 2009. REUTERS/Marco Bucco

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