Gerry's Feed
Jul 19, 2013

One Asiana victim killed by a vehicle, not plane crash: coroner

SAN MATEO, California (Reuters) – A teenage passenger on the Asiana Airlines jet that crashed in San Francisco died from injuries sustained after being run over by a motor vehicle, most likely a fire truck at the scene, local officials said on Friday.

Ye Mengyuan, a 16-year old girl who sat toward the rear of Flight 214, survived the Boeing 777′s crash-landing on July 6 but died from blunt force injuries consistent with being run over by an emergency response vehicle, San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault and San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said at a news conference.

Jul 17, 2013

Secret court sides with Yahoo, orders U.S. to declassify Prism surveillance ruling

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – A secret U.S. court overseeing government domestic surveillance activities has sided with Yahoo Inc and ordered the Obama administration to declassify and publish a 2008 court decision justifying Prism, the data collection program revealed last month by former security contractor Edward Snowden.

The ruling could offer a rare glimpse into how the government has legally justified its spy agencies’ data collection programs under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA).

Jul 16, 2013

Secret surveillance court orders U.S. to declassify Prism-related Yahoo ruling

SAN FRANCISCO, July 16 (Reuters) – A secret court overseeing
U.S. government domestic surveillance activities has sided with
Yahoo Inc and ordered the Obama administration to
declassify and publish a 2008 court decision justifying Prism,
the data collection program revealed last month by former
security contractor Edward Snowden.

Judge Reggie Walton of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance
Court issued Monday’s ruling. The government is expected to
decide by August 26 which parts of the ruling may be published,
according to a separate court filing by the Justice Department.

Jul 16, 2013

Asiana to sue TV station after gaffe over pilot name

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Asiana Airlines said Monday it will sue a TV station that incorrectly reported racially offensive names of four pilots onboard the flight that crash-landed on July 6 at San Francisco International Airport.

An anchorwoman at KTVU, a Cox affiliate based in Oakland, California, fell victim on Friday to an apparent prank and reported four bogus pilot names, including “Sum Ting Wong” and “Wi Tu Low,” during the noon newscast. Within hours, the broadcast footage had gone viral on the Internet, drawing widespread criticism and ridicule.

Jul 15, 2013

Asiana says it will sue TV station after pilot name gaffe

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Asiana Airlines said Monday it will sue a TV station that incorrectly reported racially offensive names of four pilots onboard the flight that crash-landed in early July at San Francisco International Airport.

An anchorwoman at KTVU, a Fox affiliate based in Oakland, California, fell victim on Friday to an apparent prank and reported four bogus pilot names, including “Sum Ting Wong” and “Wi Tu Low,” during the noon newscast. Within hours, the broadcast footage had gone viral on the Internet, drawing widespread criticism and ridicule.

Jul 15, 2013

Analysis: Well-known hazards seen as likely factors in Asiana crash

SAN FRANCISCO/ SEATTLE (Reuters) – In the seconds before Asiana Airlines Flight 214 slammed into a seawall at San Francisco airport on July 6, pilots realized the plane was flying too low and much too slowly – even though, they told investigators, they had set a control system called an auto-throttle to keep the Boeing 777 at a constant speed.

The pilots belatedly tried to abort the landing, but it was too late. Three Chinese students died in the crash, and at least 14 people remain in hospitals with severe injuries.

Jul 15, 2013

Well-known hazards seen as likely factors in Asiana crash

SAN FRANCISCO/ SEATTLE (Reuters) – In the seconds before Asiana Airlines Flight 214 slammed into a seawall at San Francisco airport on July 6, pilots realized the plane was flying too low and much too slowly – even though, they told investigators, they had set a control system called an auto-throttle to keep the Boeing 777 at a constant speed.

The pilots belatedly tried to abort the landing, but it was too late. Three Chinese students died in the crash, and at least 14 people remain in hospitals with severe injuries.

Jul 13, 2013

Third Chinese schoolgirl dies in Asiana air crash

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – A Chinese girl died in a San Francisco hospital on Friday, becoming the third fatality in the crash of an Asiana Airlines jet at the city’s airport last Saturday, doctors and Chinese officials said.

The teenage girl, who died on Friday morning, had been in critical condition, according to a statement from two doctors at San Francisco General Hospital. Her parents asked the hospital not to release further information.

Jul 12, 2013

No sign automatic equipment failed in San Francisco crash- NTSB

SAN FRANCISCO, July 11 (Reuters) – There are no signs of
failure of the autopilot or other key automatic flight equipment
on the Asiana plane that crashed in San Francisco last week, the
head of National Transportation Safety Board said on Thursday.

“There is no anomalous behavior of the autopilot, of the
flight director, and of the auto-throttles, based on the FDR
(flight data recorder) data reviewed to date,” NTSB Chairwoman
Deborah Hersman told a news conference, referring to the flight
data recorder from the Boeing 777.

Jul 11, 2013

Asiana passengers initially told not to evacuate after crash

SAN FRANCISCO, July 10 (Reuters) – Passengers aboard the
Asiana Airlines plane that crashed in San Francisco were
initially told not to evacuate the aircraft after it skidded to
a halt on the runway, a federal safety official said on
Wednesday.

But a flight attendant saw fire outside the plane, and the
call to exit was made, 90 seconds after the crash, said National
Transportation Safety Board Chairwoman Deborah Hersman at a San
Francisco press conference. The first emergency response
vehicles arrived 30 seconds later.