Global News Journal

from Photographers' Blog:

Perceptions of North Korea

February 29, 2008

 

 


Landing at North Korea's Pyongyang International Airport to cover the two-day visit by the New York Philharmonic, we did not know what to expect. Myself, and Reuters TV cameraman Anil Ekmecic, had never been to Korea before, and what must be a fairly unusual experience, we could now say we traveled to Korea via the reclusive North first.

from FaithWorld:

Turkey’s covered women fed up with politics over their headscarves

February 28, 2008

It started as a women's protest for the right to wear Muslim headscarves at university, in this case at Marmara University in Istanbul. Then the men showed up with their banners and megaphones, lined up in front of the cameras and began speaking in place of the women. That left the ladies standing demurely on the sidelines or in the crowd, all decked out with their bright silk scarves with nothing to do but clap at what the men said.

Dear Leader misses the show

February 27, 2008

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By Jon Herskovitz

Being the leader of one of the world ’s most paranoid states can make a person, well,  paranoid. So when guests to the New York Philharmonic ’s concert in Pyongyang arrived to very little security, it was obvious that North Korean leader Kim Jong-il wouldn’t be attending.

On the road in Pyongyang

February 26, 2008

By Jon Herskovitz 

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What a way to start my first full day in Pyongyang. Our breakfast spread was amazing. It was a lavish affair with ice sculptures, more types of cereal than can be found at Kellogg’s, two fancy espresso makers and a lot of North Koreans hovering nearby. I had myself a ham omelet and a nice cup of coffee. There wasn’t a Starbucks in sight!

North Korea: No killing devices, exciters and poison, please

February 26, 2008

By Jon Herskovitz, on the road with the New York Philharmonic

Welcome to North Korea. Do you have any killing devices?

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I do not, but North Koreans certainly want to know. It’s on the customs form. Visitors to one of the world’s most isolated states are asked to tick a box if they are carrying: weapons, ammunition, explosives, and killing devices. Other no-nos include “exciters” and poison.

Fancy dining in Pyongyang

February 26, 2008

By John Herskovitz 

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North Korea may be suffering from a chronic food shortage but that did not stop the impoverished state from throwing a lavish dinner reception for the New York Philharmonic for their first night in Pyongyang.

from Pakistan: Now or Never?:

Going after al Qaeda in Pakistan

February 25, 2008

Reports last week in the New York Times and the Washington Post about CIA operations against al Qaeda inside Pakistan -- with or without the permission of the Pakistan government -- have got everybody asking what exactly is going on. Let's rewind and look at what the United States asked for immediately after 9/11 when it demanded President Pervez Musharraf's cooperation in hunting down al Qaeda.

Kim Jong-il: Will he or won’t he go to concert?

February 25, 2008

    Reuters correspondent Jon Herskovitz goes behind the scenes to look at the greatest U.S. show ever to hit one of the world’s most isolated countries, North Korea.

from Pakistan: Now or Never?:

Pakistan: Can America square the circle?

February 20, 2008

Scanning the U.S. media for reaction to the Pakistan election, two themes stand out.  One is a U.S. desire to reach out to the newly elected political leaders in Pakistan and bolster a return to civilian-led democracy. The other is the U.S. need to shore up the battle against al Qaeda and the Taliban -- even if it means pursuing them aggressively inside Pakistan's lawless tribal areas.  One may turn out to contradict the other.

from Pakistan: Now or Never?:

Pakistan election – what next for Musharraf?

February 19, 2008

President Musharraf votes/Reuters TVPresident Pervez Musharraf could hardly have found a better way of convincing the world about his commitment to holding a "free and fair" election in Pakistan -- by letting his own allies in the Pakistan Muslim League (Q) be defeated at the polls.