Global News Journal

Beyond the World news headlines

from Africa News blog:

Sudan struggles

By reaching the gates of Khartoum, Darfur rebels have dealt one of the heaviest blows to Sudan's traditionally Arab ruling elite since independence in 1956.

Early on Sunday, it looked as though government assertions that the army had beaten back the initial assault were true, but what is the attack going to mean for Africa's biggest country and the way it is run?

The peace deal with south Sudanese rebels in 2005 made clear Khartoum could no longer afford to rule by force over a mostly black African region where Christians and animists predominate.

Now rebels from Muslim, but largely non-Arab, Darfur have shown the ability of groups who feel neglected in the rest of Sudan to take the battle to Khartoum.
Will there be retaliation in Darfur? Sudan has oil money to buy weapons, but if the war could be won militarily then why has that not happened already?

Myanmar: Bloggers discuss cyclone disaster

Mong Palatino is South East Asia editor of Global Voices, which monitors citizen media in the developing world. Thomson Reuters is not responsible for the content of this post — the views are the author’s alone.

Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar last weekend which devastated five regions. State-run media reported that more than 22,000 people are found dead with another 41,000 missing. Hundreds of thousands are now homeless. The following is a collection of quotes from regional bloggers about the devastation.

Zimbabwe: New Technologies in Fight for Democracy

Photo

Ndesanjo Macha is Sub-Saharan Africa Editor of Global Voices, which monitors citizen media in the developing world. Thomson Reuters is not responsible for the content of this post — the views are the author’s alone.

In countries such as Zimbabwe where media and political freedom is extremely restricted, new technologies have become powerful tools for political campaigning, communication, advocacy and mobilisation. Bloggers and civic organisations have resorted to using new tools and applications such as Flickr, Facebook, SMS text messages, YouTube and mashups to fight for democracy, media freedom and good governance.

Haiti: finding relief for hunger in children

Photo

Juliana Rincon is video editor of Global Voices, which monitors citizen media in the developing world. Thomson Reuters is not responsible for the content of this post — the views are the author’s alone.

Reasons not to Overeat by BreezeDebris(lucidnutrition.com) used according to CC license.
Reasons not to Overeat by BreezeDebris

The international food shortage and crisis is doing its rounds on the blogosphere, and videos are no exception. From Haiti: people eating dirt to survive, and a plan to help feed hungry Haitian children. Haiti is the poorest country in the American continent, and hunger has been an important issue since before this crisis took to the headlines.

from Pakistan: Now or Never?:

Is a spring offensive in Afghanistan really likely?

(Luke Baker is with the U.S. army in eastern Afghanistan) 

January file photo of U.S. Black Hawk in Afghanistan/Ahmad MasoodThe snows have largely melted in the Hindu Kush and the high trails over the mountains between Pakistan and Afghanistan are once again passable. What's more, Tehrik-e-Taliban's leader, Baitullah Mehsud, looks like he may secure a peace deal with Pakistan's new leadership, including the possibility of Pakistan's security forces backing off from attacking his hideouts in South Waziristan.

To many observers, those two developments lead to a conclusion: any spring offensive by the Taliban against U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan could be that much more powerful this year, with Mehsud throwing his tactical weight behind the offensive without fear of being squeezed by Pakistan's forces from behind.
 
U.S. soldier searches Afghan man for weapons/Goran TomasevicThe argument has a fair amount of logic on its side, but how likely is the whole scenario really?

from Africa News blog:

Should Tsvangirai accept a runoff poll in Zimbabwe?

MDC leader Morgan TsvangiraiAfter a month of withholdingZimbabwe's presidential poll results, electoral authorities on May 2 announced what was widely known to be the real outcome: President Robert Mugabe had lost the vote. The announcement gave opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai 47.9 percent of the vote but said he faces a runoff after failing to gain enough votes for an outright majority. Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change denounced the result as scandalous and maintained its stand that it had won more than 50 percent of the vote and that Mugabe's 28-year rule was over.

The MDC faces a huge dilemma. If it boycotts a runoff poll, it would hand victory to Mugabe by default. But in the view of the MDC, human rights groups and Western governments, no fair or credible runoff poll can be held in Zimbabwe under a current climate of violence and intimidation they say is orchestrated by Mugabe's ruling ZANU-PF. The MDC and Mugabe's critics at home and abroad have also condemned the unprecedented delay in announcing the presidential result as part of the government's grand plan to rig the vote in favour of Mugabe.

  •