Global News Journal

Ex-U.S. spy recalls years on no-fly list

September 4, 2008

Posted by Randall Mikkelsen

ORLANDO, Fla – Decades of passing lie detector tests and the most stringent background checks count little when it comes to the U.S. no-fly terrorist watch list, the Pentagon’s former spy chief recalled on Monday.airport.jpg

Can Cyprus “comrades” clinch a deal?

September 3, 2008

The leaders of Cyprus’s Greek and Turkish communities sipped coffee and called each other “comrade” as they launched a new round of talks on reuniting the island, whose 34-year division has exasperated the most committed of mediators.     
 Cypriot President Christofias shakes hands with Turkish Cypriot President Ali Talat during a news conference after their meeting in Nicosia                            
This time, foreign diplomats and analysts say, a solution is in sight, thanks largely to the two moderate, leftist men heading the negotiations – Greek Cypriot Demetris Christofias and Turkish Cypriot Mehmet Ali Talat.

Gaddafi – No longer “Mad Dog” of Middle East

September 3, 2008

Libyan leader Gaddafi listens to a speaker at the African Union summitOnce called the “mad dog of the Middle East” by President Ronald Reagan, Libya’s leader Muammar Gaddafi will meet U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice this week.

Weathering the storm: “This is part of life over here”

September 2, 2008

(Charles Abbyad, 58, is the maitre d’ at Arnaud’s, a classic creole restaurant in the center of New Orleans. With his wife, Jill, he keeps a guesthouse called The Chimes in the city’s historic Garden District. Abbyad chose to stay behind and ride out Hurricane Gustav with Reuters reporters Matt Bigg and Tim Gaynor.)

Bulgaria sends in pensioners to retake beaches

September 2, 2008

bulgaria-bathers.jpgFive thousand Bulgarian pensioners are in line for a free holiday.

Could it be a vote catcher ahead of elections next year in the European Union’s poorest member state? The government’s standing in the polls has suffered because of poor living standards and corruption.

Escaping Saudi Arabia

September 2, 2008

One of the oddest, and yet most understandable, features of
Saudi society is the need that many of its citizens have to
escape themselves. For the clerics who are given massive
influence in the running of society beyond the key
decision-making areas of government — the preserve of the Saudi
royal family — Saudi Arabia is no less than their own private
Utopia. They are given free rein by the ruling family to
administer their version of Islamic sharia law through the
courts, the education system and the mosques. They even have a
police force all of their own in the form of the notorious
Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice.
 

from UK News:

Is the housing package enough?

September 2, 2008

housing.jpgThe government proposes to stimulate the housing market by scrapping stamp duty for a year on purchases of homes worth less than 175,000 pounds.

Weathering the storm: If the canal breaks

September 2, 2008

(Charles Abbyad, 58, is the maitre d’ at Arnaud’s, a classic creole restaurant in the center of New Orleans. With his wife, Jill, he keeps a guesthouse called The Chimes in the city’s historic Garden District. While thousands of residents are packing their cars and fleeing Hurricane Gustav, Abbyad is staying behind with Reuters reporters Matt Bigg and Tim Gaynor to ride out the storm.)

When push comes to shove: Israeli-Palestinian diplomacy

September 1, 2008

Posted by Jeffrey Heller

 With the clock winding down on his scandal-plagued tenure as Israel’s prime minister, Ehud Olmert wanted to get perhaps a final message across in his talks this weekend with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

from Pakistan: Now or Never?:

Mergers, Afghan style

September 1, 2008

salesman2.jpgThe way Nisar Ahmad sees it, the war in Afghanistan has been pretty good to him. The 19-year-old runs a shop stall on a British military base in Helmand selling knock-off cigarettes, sunglasses, carpets and other assorted trinkets to young soldiers eager to spend their cash. On a good day, he takes in anywhere between $300 and $400 as the nicotine-hungry snap up 10-packs of Chinese-made, fake Marlboro cigarettes for just $5 a pop, or a pair of fake designer shades for $15. Sometimes he's feeling generous and knocks them down to $10. Even with the cost of buying the merchandise in Kabul and driving it down to the far south of the country, into Taliban country and frequently through militant checkpoints, he still reckons he takes anywhere between $80 and $100 a day in profit.
 
"It's good money, very good money," he says with a broad grin, showing off a gappy, yellowing smile. "I didn't go to school but everybody he go to school he not make money same as me," he explains in his faltering English, learnt during six years of working on British and American bases.